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  • AR306 Darkroom Photography
  • AR316 Digital Photography
  • AR318 Open Studio
  • AR320 Drawing
  • AR322 Painting
  • AR324 Art and Technology
  • AR350 Advanced Drawing
  • AR352 Advanced Painting
  • AR354 Advanced Studio Art
  • AS403 Writing and American Studies
  • AS405 American Studies
  • BI302 Honors Epidemiology
  • BI304 Honors Agricultural Biotechnology
  • BI352 Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BI356 Sports Kinesiology I
  • BI358 Classical Genetics (*M*)
  • BI358 Honors Classical Genetics
  • BI360 Honors Molecular Genetics
  • BI360 Molecular Genetics (*M*)
  • BI364 Developmental Biology (*R*)
  • BI370 Evolution
  • BI374 Ecology (*R*)
  • BI390 Research Experience in Biology (*R*)
  • BI400 Aquatic Ecology (*R*)
  • BI402 Evolution with Advanced Topics (*M*)
  • BI404 Climate Change Biology (*M*)
  • BI404 Honors Climate Change Biology
  • BI406 Neuroscience (*R*)
  • BI408 Sports Kinesiology II
  • BI410 Molecular and Cellular Biology
  • BI416 Anatomy and Physiology II (*R*)
  • BI422 Immunology (*R*)
  • BI424 AP Environmental Science (I)
  • BI426 AP Environmental Science (II)
  • BI434 AP Biology (I) (*R*)
  • BI436 AP Biology (II) (*R*)
  • BI438 AP Biology (III) (*R*)
  • BI442 Research in Biology I (*R*)
  • BI444 Research in Biology II (*R*)
  • BI446 Research in Biology III (*R*)
  • BI448 Research in Biology IV (*R*)
  • CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry
  • CH353 Chemistry
  • CH354 CH354 Chemistry/Adv Topics
  • CH360 Topics in Chemistry
  • CH390 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH401 AP Chemistry (I)
  • CH402 AP Chemistry (II)
  • CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I)
  • CH406 AP Chemistry (Advanced II)
  • CH408 Analytical Chemistry
  • CH410 Organic Chemistry
  • CH410 Honors Organic Chemistry
  • CH412 Honors Intro to Computational Chemistry
  • CH414 Honors Computational Medicinal Chemistry
  • CH416 Environmental Chemistry
  • CH418 Biochemistry (*R*)
  • CH420 Introduction to Applied Chemistry and Engineering
  • CH422 Polymer Chemistry
  • CH428 Materials Chemistry (*R*)
  • CH430 Honors Nanotechnology & Research
  • CH442 Research Chem I (*R*)
  • CH444 Research Chem II (*R*)
  • CH446 Research Chem III (*R*)
  • CH448 Research Chem IV (*R*)
  • CN305 Introductory Chinese
  • CN307 Intermediate Chinese
  • CN354 Advanced Chinese I
  • CN356 Advanced Chinese II
  • CN358 Advanced Chinese III
  • CN404 Readings in Chinese with Topics I
  • CN406 Readings in Chinese with Topics II
  • CN408 Readings in Chinese with Topics III
  • CN454 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics I
  • CN456 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics II
  • CN458 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics III
  • CS302 Programming with Engineering Applications
  • CS358 Cryptography
  • CS358 Honors Cryptography
  • CS360 /AR360 Art, Technology, and Computing
  • CS402 Web Development
  • CS404 Game Design and Simulation
  • CS406 Scientific Programming
  • CS406 Honors Introduction to Scientific Programming
  • CS422 Databases
  • CS424 Procedural Programming
  • CS426 Java
  • CS428 Advanced Java
  • CS432 Machine Learning
  • CS434 C
  • CS436 Data Structures
  • CS438 Algorithms
  • CS490 Advanced Computer Science Topics
  • CS492 Advanced Computer Topics
  • CS494 Advanced Computer Topics
  • DR302 Theater Performance Workshop
  • DR304 Theater Performance Workshop
  • DR306 Theater Performance Workshop
  • EE308 History of Engineering and Technology
  • EE310 CAD/CAM
  • EE316 Introductory Robotics
  • EE318 Fundamentals of Engineering
  • EE356 Honors Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • EE362 Engineering the Modern
  • EE370 Biomechanics of Injury
  • EE390 Research Experience in Engineering
  • EE400 Mechanical Engineering
  • EE402 Electrical Engineering
  • EE404 Architecture
  • EE408 Biomedical Engineering
  • EE408 Honors Biomedical Engineering
  • EE414 Honors Aerospace Engineering
  • EE414 Aerospace Engineering
  • EE416 Civil Engineering
  • EE418 Environmental Engineering
  • EE442 Research in Engineering and Computer Science I
  • EE444 Research in Engineering and Computer Science II
  • EE452 Biomedical Instrumentation
  • EE454 Statics
  • EE456 Circuits
  • EN354 Fiction Writing
  • EN356 Film Studies
  • EN362 Classical Myth: Epic and Tragedy
  • EN364 Honors Ecocriticism: Literature and Nature
  • EN366 Poetry Writing
  • EN368 Gram-O-Rama
  • EN390 Research Experience in the Humanities
  • EN400 East-West Studies I: Intellectual Frameworks and Ethical Foundations
  • EN402 British Literature and Culture to 1603
  • EN404 British Literature and Culture, 1603 – 1837: From Shakespeare to Frankenstein
  • EN406 British Literature and Culture since 1837: From Wuthering Heights to High Modernism and Beyond
  • EN408 East-West Studies II: Ideational and Material Conflicts
  • EN412 Southern Literature and Culture
  • EN414 Modern World Fiction: Narrating the Self
  • EN416 Asia I: Ethical Structures and Frameworks of Power
  • EN418 Asia II: Dynastic Change amid Le Peril Blanc
  • EN420 Asia III: Virtual Asians and the Occidental Gaze
  • EN422 Philosophy and Literature in the Twentieth Century: Strategies for Being
  • EN424 Africa I: Pre-Colonial Africa
  • EN426 Africa II: Modern Africa
  • EN428 Africa III: Modern North Africa and the Middle East
  • EN430 Latin America I: Encounter, Conquest, and Colonialism
  • EN432 Latin America II: Revolution, Nationhood, and the Search for Identity and Autonomy
  • EN436 Western European Cultural Studies I: Classical and Late Antiquity: Greeks, Romans, and the Genesis of the Mediterranean World
  • EN438 Western European Cultural Studies II: Medieval and Modern Worlds from St. Augustine to Shakespeare
  • EN440 Western European Cultural Studies III:  Fashioning Selves and Societies in the Modern World
  • EN442 Western Civilizations:  Wisdom, Revelation, Reason & Doubt I (The Ancient World to the Early Middle Ages)
  • EN444 Western Civilizations:  Wisdom, Revelation, Reason & Doubt II (The High Middle Ages to the Enlightenment)
  • EN446 Western Civilizations:  Wisdom, Revelation, Reason & Doubt III (The Modern World)
  • EN448 (Topics in Lit) Modern Latin American Literature in Translation (Topic for T1 and T2, 2019-2020)
  • EN450 (Topics in Lit) Literature of the American West (Topic for T2, 2019-2020)
  • EN452 Topics in Literature III
  • EN454 Topics in Literature IV
  • EN460 STEM and the Stage
  • EN462 Shakespeare Now
  • EN490 Research in the Humanities I
  • EN492 Research in the Humanities II
  • FR305 Introductory French
  • FR307 Intermediate French
  • FR354 Advanced French I
  • FR356 Advanced French II
  • FR358 Advanced French III
  • FR404 Modern French Readings and Media I
  • FR406 Modern French Readings and Media II
  • FR408 Modern French Readings and Media III
  • HU350 Twentieth-Century Music History
  • HU354 Black Studies
  • HU356 History of Western Music
  • HU358 Race, Leadership, and Ethics
  • HU362 Topics in Contemporary America
  • HU364 Women's Studies
  • HU366 Critical Race Theory
  • HU390 Research Experience in the Fine Arts
  • IE304 Ignite to Engage
  • IE306 Honors Forensic Science
  • IE308 Explorations in Mentorship
  • IE340 Honors Introduction to Computational Science
  • IE350 Honors Forensic Anthropology
  • IE360 Digital Humanities
  • IE362 Honors Data Science for Scientists
  • IE380 Honors Bioinformatics: Computational Biology
  • IE390 Honors Research Experience in Computational Science
  • IE402 Honors Introduction to Industrial Chemistry & Engineering
  • IE404 Engage to Impact
  • IE405 Senior Mentorship
  • IE406 Extended Senior Mentorship
  • IE408 Honors Energy and Sustainability
  • IE410 Honors Introduction to Systems Thinking: Modeling the Environment
  • IE442 Research in Computational Science I
  • IE444 Research in Computational Science I
  • IE446 Research in Computational Science III
  • IE448 Research in Computational Sci IV
  • IE449 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
  • IE449 Honors Introduction to Entrepreneurship 1
  • IE450 Applications in Entrepreneurship
  • JA305 Introductory Japanese
  • JA307 Intermediate Japanese
  • LA305 Introductory Latin
  • LA307 Intermediate Latin
  • LA404 Advanced Latin Poetry I
  • LA406 Advanced Latin Poetry II
  • LA408 Advanced Latin Poetry III
  • LA410 Advanced Latin Prose I
  • LA412 Advanced Latin Prose II
  • LA414 Advanced Latin Prose III
  • MA301 Algebra 3
  • MA355 Precalculus and Modeling
  • MA358 Cryptography
  • MA360 Investigations in Calculus I
  • MA362 Investigations in Calculus II
  • MA364 Investigations in Calculus III
  • MA366 Honors Math for Social Justice
  • MA368 Finite Mathematics
  • MA370 Advanced Algebra Applications
  • MA372 Explorations in Advanced Geometry
  • MA402 Introduction to Data Science
  • MA404 AP Statistics I
  • MA406 AP Statistics II
  • MA408 AP Statistics III
  • MA410 AP Calculus AP (Advanced Topics I)
  • MA412 AP Calculus AP (Advanced Topics II)
  • MA414 AP Calculus AP (Advanced Topics III)
  • MA416 AP Calculus AB
  • MA420 AP Calculus BC (I) Contemporary Calculus
  • MA422 AP Calculus BC (II) Contemporary Calculus
  • MA424 AP Calculus BC (III) Contemporary Calculus
  • MA426 AP Calculus BC
  • MA430 AP Calc BC (Adv Topics I)
  • MA432 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics II) Contemporary Calculus
  • MA434 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics III) Contemporary Calculus
  • MA436 Advanced Probability Models
  • MA440 AP Statistics (Advanced Topics I)
  • MA442 AP Statistics (Advanced Topics II)
  • MA444 AP Statistics (Advanced Topics III)
  • MA446 Advanced Mathematical Problem Solving I
  • MA448 Advanced Mathematical Problem Solving II
  • MA450 Advanced Mathematical Problem Solving III
  • MA452 Explorations in Advanced Geometry with Topics
  • MA454 Modeling with Differential Equations
  • MA456 Numerical Analysis
  • MA458 Honors Complex Systems
  • MA458 Introduction to Complex Systems
  • MA460 Number Theory
  • MA462 Modeling with Matrices
  • MA464 Combinatorics and Game Theory
  • MA466 Graph Theory and Introduction to Proof
  • MA468 Structure and Dynamics of Modern Networks
  • MA470 Mathematical Modeling
  • MA472 Research in Mathematics I
  • MA474 Research in Mathematics II
  • MA476 Abstract Algebra
  • MA478 Advanced Combinatorics and Game Theory
  • MA480 Vector Functions and Partial Derivatives
  • MA482 Multiple Integral and Vector Fields
  • MA484 Honors Multivariable Calculus I with Applications
  • MA486 Honors Multivariable Calculus II with Applications
  • MA490 Advanced Mathematical Topics
  • MA492 Advanced Mathematical Topics
  • MA494 Advanced Mathematical Topics
  • MS312 Classical Piano and Guitar: Theory and Practice
  • MS314 Classical Piano and Guitar: Theory and Practice
  • MS316 Classical Piano and Guitar: Theory and Practice
  • MS322 Music Theory and Composition
  • MS336 Audio and Digital Music Production
  • MS350 Jazz Performance Workshop
  • MS352 Jazz Performance Workshop
  • MS354 Jazz Performance Workshop
  • MS363 Advanced Audio Recording Technology
  • MS402 AP Music Theory
  • MU302 Chorale
  • MU304 Chorale
  • MU306 Chorale
  • MU360 Wind Ensemble
  • MU362 Wind Ensemble
  • MU364 Wind Ensemble
  • MU370 Orchestra
  • MU372 Orchestra
  • MU374 Orchestra
  • PA102 Disc Golf
  • PA104 Archery
  • PA108 Ultimate Frisbee
  • PA112 Tennis
  • PA118 Racquetball
  • PA126 Badminton
  • PA128 Fit for Life
  • PA130 Mountain Biking
  • PA132 Broadway Dance
  • PA134 Advanced Dance Techniques I
  • PA136 Hiking
  • PA138 Dance Appreciation
  • PA140 Self Defense
  • PA142 Weight Training for Sports and Fitness
  • PA144 Zumba
  • PA146 Pilates and Yoga
  • PA148 Introduction to Fitness
  • PA150 Studio to Stage
  • PA152 Ballet
  • PA154 Advanced Dance Techniques II
  • PA158 Couch to 5K
  • PA160 Circuit Training
  • PA162 Rock Wall Climbing
  • PA164 Advanced Dance Techniques III
  • PA166 TRX Suspension Training
  • PA168 POP Pilates
  • PH304 Astronomy
  • PH352 Waves, Sound and Optics
  • PH353 Physics
  • PH390 Research Experience in Physics (*R*)
  • PH401 Physics with Advanced Topics (*M*)
  • PH402 Physics/Adv Topics II
  • PH404 AP Physics C: Mechanics (I)
  • PH406 AP Physics C: Mechanics (II)/Electricity and Magnetism (I)
  • PH408 AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (II)
  • PH410 Modern Physics
  • PH412 Computational Physics
  • PH412 Honors Computational Physics
  • PH414 Advanced Physics Problem Solving
  • PH416 Quantum Mechanics
  • PH418 Astrophysics
  • PH420 Galaxies and Cosmology
  • PH442 Research in Physics I (*R*)
  • PH444 Research in Physics II (*R*)
  • PH446 Research in Physics III (*R*)
  • PH448 Research in Physics IV (*R*)
  • RE102 Cornerstone: Foundational Life Skills
  • RE110 Exploring Multicultural America
  • RE112 Public Speaking
  • RE116 Marketing You
  • RE118 Excellence in Leadership
  • RE120 Financial Planning
  • RE122 NCSSM to College
  • SE160 Sports Medicine I
  • SE162 Sports Medicine I
  • SE352 Emergency Care of Illness and Injuries II
  • SE402 Emergency Care of Illness and Injuries I
  • SEM102 Explorations In Math Modeling and Research Seminar
  • SEM200 SEM200 Scholar Development: Cognitive and Metacognitive Skills
  • SP305 Introductory Spanish
  • SP307 Intermediate Spanish
  • SP354 Advanced Spanish I
  • SP356 Advanced Spanish II
  • SP358 Advanced Spanish III
  • SP404 Readings in Spanish with Topics I
  • SP406 Readings in Spanish with Topics II
  • SP408 Readings in Spanish with Topics III
  • SP454 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics I
  • SP456 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics II
  • SP458 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics III
  • VS102 Men's Soccer
  • VS104 Women's Volleyball
  • VS106 Women's Tennis
  • VS108 Cross-Country
  • VS110 Competitive Cheer
  • VS112 Women's Golf
  • VS122 Men's Basketball
  • VS124 Women's Basketball
  • VS126 Swimming
  • VS128 Wrestling
  • VS130 Cheerleading
  • VS132 Indoor Track
  • VS134 Diving
  • VS142 Men's Golf
  • VS144 Men's Tennis
  • VS146 Men's Baseball
  • VS148 Women's Softball
  • VS150 Women's Soccer
  • VS152 Track and Field
  •      AR306

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    AR306 Darkroom Photography

    Students get to know the NCSSM darkroom while learning how to use enlargers, mix photographic chemicals, and, by the trimester's end, process and print their own film. After becoming familiar with the basic use, function, and history of a 35mm camera, students create black and white prints on 8" x 10" photography paper. This class utilizes instructor-assisted darkroom work along with independent student work so that students become confident with their abilities to execute, develop, and create photographic prints. Students are expected to maintain a safe and respectful darkroom etiquette, which includes proper handling of chemicals and equipment while developing a healthy studio practice. Although this course is catered to the beginner, all levels of experience are welcome. Intermediate and advanced students will be required to propose projects, meet deadlines, and share techniques used during formal critiques. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      AR316

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    AR316 Digital Photography

    This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques necessary to create, edit, and print color photographic images using digital technology. Units on composition, color theory, image-editing, printing options, and digital image storage are also covered. Students focus on personal exploration using technology as a creative medium for visual expression. Students are expected to respect photography equipment, the art studio, and develop a healthy studio practice.

    Meeting Times:
    Two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      AR318

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    AR318 Open Studio

    Open Studio allows students to develop and transform their own inspirations and conceptions into an artistic reality with the ongoing support of the instructor. Although students generate their projects, they are challenged to link their concepts to a branch of philosophy, to study artists who have worked with similar concepts or materials, and to close the trimester with a formal critique/presentation about their art and research. The purpose of this course is to gain feedback from the instructor and classmates through one-on-one critiques. Students develop a dialogue about art and learn to articulate their aesthetic values through giving and receiving constructive criticism. This course is perfect for students who have a creative idea and seek the time needed for artistic development. Students work with the instructor to find methods of visually communicating their concepts and have ample studio time to do so. Enrolled students have access to all studio equipment and art materials needed to bring their ideas to life. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      AR320

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    AR320 Drawing

    Drawing is the foundation of all art studio practices and is highly recommended as a prerequisite for all other art courses. A creative mind is increasingly sought out in every professional career track as art elements and design concepts are interdisciplinary. This course is taught to nurture creative and critical thinking, increase visual communication skills, and reacquaint the student with the "artist within." No experience is necessary! All students receive individual feedback from the instructor and further engage with classmates during studio time and the critiquing process. Through traditional drawing exercises with pencil, charcoal, and ink, students gain creative applications to better interpret reality and respond to their aesthetic values. In addition to in-class drawing assignments, all students are given a sketchbook to heighten their observation skills while building a visual vocabulary and further documenting their time at NCSSM. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      AR322

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    AR322 Painting

    This course is an introduction to basic painting, although all levels of experience are welcome. The primary goal of this course is to develop students' painting skills through constant exploration of visual perception. Assignments address the use of both acrylic and oil paint to create dynamic compositions that incorporate elements such as depth of field, line, texture, linear perspective, and illusion – while students gain knowledge to better understand light and the interaction of color. Students enhance their levels of perception as they learn color theory. No grade can compete with the gift that comes from intuitive color mixing. Through assignments and presentations by the instructor, students gain knowledge, inspiration, and appreciation for art history and from artists working today. All students receive individual feedback from the instructor and further engage with classmates during studio time and the critiquing process. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      AR324

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    AR324 Art and Technology

    This studio art course asks students to expand on their definition of art to include technology as a platform for creativity. Students will be introduced to the resources in NCSSM's FabLab and our new Creative Technology Lab, which houses a Virtual Reality Painting Studio, and to a variety of other digital applications and equipment. Students will have the time to develop their skills on their choice of state-of-the-art equipment while bringing their creative ideas into existence. Although there is no prerequisite for this course, priority use of our Virtual Reality Painting Studio will be given to students who have already taken AR320 Drawing. The goal of this course is to develop and expand on creative skills and construct an innovative work of art. Through slide presentations, readings and class discussions, students will gain knowledge and appreciation of art history while becoming more familiar with artists who are working with groundbreaking methods and materials. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab.

  •      AR350

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of AR320 Drawing.
    Related Links: AR320

    AR350 Advanced Drawing

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR320 Drawing. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two periods per week plus one 100-minute evening class meeting.

  •      AR352

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of AR322 Painting.
    Related Links: AR322

    AR352 Advanced Painting

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR322 Painting. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two periods per week plus one 100-minute evening class meeting.

  •      AR354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Art
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of AR318 Open Studio or AR324 Art and Technology
    Related Links: AR318, AR324

    AR354 Advanced Studio Art

    This largely self-paced advanced art course allows students the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques acquired in AR318 Open Studio or AR324 Art and Technology. Students are encouraged to take creative risks while building their art portfolios and expanding on their definitions of drawing. Emphasis is placed on creating more complex visual statements, increasing comprehension of conceptual content, and developing further technical competence. Students will create an independent body of work and demonstrate their ability to speak critically and professionally about their art. In addition to studio time, this course includes a sketchbook assignment, a written artist statement, and at least one formal critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week plus one 100-minute evening class meeting.

  •      AS403

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    AS403 Writing and American Studies

    American Studies is the core humanities experience for all NCSSM juniors. In this interdisciplinary cultural studies course, we explore American history and literature from the fifteenth-century Atlantic World to twenty-first-century digital communities. The year-long course sequence examines the continuing development of both collective and individual American identities through the study of history and historiography, literature and literary theory, politics, economics, the visual arts, film, music, and other aspects of American culture. A key feature of the curriculum is instruction and practice in critical reading, thinking, and writing – skills foundational to NCSSM's senior humanities courses and to future higher-level work across disciplines. Discussions, projects, and written assessments invite students to recover, construct, and interpret the past as narratives woven from many threads. Through collaborative inquiry and investigation, students encounter the past as a means of interrogating issues in our current world and as a path to becoming active citizens in their local and global communities. AS403 is grounded in the same curricular content as AS405 but is designed especially for students who need more intensive practice to develop their skills in critical reading, interpretation, and academic writing. Working collaboratively in small groups and with their teachers, students hone their skills in reading, in analyzing what they read, and in planning, developing, and writing the academic essay.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab (trimester 1); four periods per week including lab (trimesters 2 and 3).

  •      AS405

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    AS405 American Studies

    American Studies is the core humanities experience for all NCSSM juniors. In this interdisciplinary cultural studies course, we explore American history and literature from the fifteenth-century Atlantic World to twenty-first-century digital communities. The year-long course sequence examines the continuing development of both collective and individual American identities through the study of history and historiography, literature and literary theory, politics, economics, the visual arts, film, music, and other aspects of American culture. A key feature of the curriculum is instruction and practice in critical reading, thinking, and writing – skills foundational to NCSSM's senior humanities courses and to future higher-level work across disciplines. Discussions, projects, and written assessments invite students to recover, construct, and interpret the past as narratives woven from many threads. Through collaborative inquiry and investigation, students encounter the past as a means of interrogating issues in our current world and as a path to becoming active citizens in their local and global communities.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab (trimester 1); four periods per week including lab (trimesters 2 and 3).

  •      BI302

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Biology/Math III

    BI302 Honors Epidemiology

    In this introductory course in human microbial disease, students explore the impact that various microbes have had in our lives, identify the characteristics of various pathogens and infectious agents, explain how diseases spread, and construct models, create presentations, and collaborate on projects related to epidemiology. Students learn the principles and methods of disease investigation: investigating patterns of illness in populations, identifying infectious microbes by visual assessment, mode of infection, and symptoms.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Monday 8:00pm OR Thursday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional
    Spring Semester: Monday 7:00pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Students should have at least one semester of biology, preferably at the honors/AP level. Additionally, completion of Math III is required. For example, successful students need a strong working background of basic statistics.

  •      BI304

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Molecular Genetics (BI360) OR Classical Genetics (BI358)
    Related Links: BI360, BI358

    BI304 Honors Agricultural Biotechnology

    As the human population grows over the next few decades, we will need to produce more food on agriculture's existing footprint, saving land for biodiversity. This can be done by improving seeds and through better management of farms-- through technological innovation. Agricultural biotechnology is thriving globally, especially in the Research Triangle here in NC as new agriculture companies set up shop to employ and collaborate with our region's' academic talent. In this course, students will examine how farms around the world are intensifying agriculture and promoting sustainability through plant breeding, transgenic plant and animal development, and soon, gene editing. They will learn about and build automated smart devices like weather stations, sensor motes, robots and drones using the Arduino platform. They will analyze agricultural data to help farmers make better decisions. And finally they will propose and prototype solutions that improve the practices of subsistence farmers and large scale growers around the world. This course meets North Carolina standards for Agriscience and Biotechnology IV: Agricultural Solutions.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Tuesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Required

  •      BI352

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI352 Anatomy and Physiology I

    This course provides an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, histology, and major organ systems, namely the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The laboratory component of this course puts special emphasis on the microscopic analysis and dissection of relevant model animals.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      BI356

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI356 Sports Kinesiology I

    This course provides an in-depth study of the skeleton and muscular structure and function of the lower extremity of the human body. Topics include origins, insertions, action and nerve innervation of muscles in the body, along with in-depth study of the skeletal lower extremity, some discussion of the central nervous system and of the cardiovascular system. The laboratory component of this course takes place in the gym and weight room where students study their own bodies to learn about the function and action of the muscles, with hands on palpation of other students.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Parental permission is required for a field trip to a human cadaver lab.

  •      BI358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI358 Classical Genetics (*M*)

    This course begins with the fundamentals of cell division and focuses on modes of inheritance of traits, beginning with Mendel's pea plants and stressing extensions and exceptions to Mendel's principles. Laboratory activities, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills are emphasized. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI358

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Biology

    BI358 Honors Classical Genetics

    This course begins with the fundamentals of cell division and focuses on modes of inheritance of traits, beginning with Mendel’s pea plants and stressing extensions and exceptions to Mendel’s principles. The course also covers topics in population genetics and molecular evolution. Problem-solving and critical thinking skills are emphasized. This course meets North Carolina standards for Agriscience and Biotechnology II: Agricultural Genetics.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Monday 8:00pm OR Tuesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019 OR November 2, 2019/ Required
    Spring Semester: Monday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020 OR March 14, 2020/ Required

  •      BI360

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Biology

    BI360 Honors Molecular Genetics

    This course focuses on DNA. Beginning with Watson and Crick’s double-helix model the course focuses on DNA structure, replication, transcription and translation. Current topics in DNA technology, gene cloning, and bioinformatics are discussed in terms of basic research, medical advancement, and for treatment of cancer & HIV. Critical thinking skills and thoughtful data interpretation are stressed. This course meets North Carolina standards for Agriscience and Biotechnology III: Agricultural Biotechnology.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Monday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Required OR September 28, 2019/ Required
    Spring Semester: Monday 7:00pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Required

  •      BI360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI360 Molecular Genetics (*M*)

    This course focuses on the Central Dogma of molecular biology. The Central Dogma is our framework for understanding how information that is coded in DNA is translated into RNA and ultimately transcribed into proteins. Beginning with Watson and Crick's double-helix model, the course focuses on DNA structure, replication, transcription and translation. Current topics in DNA technology, gene cloning and bioinformatics are discussed. Critical thinking skills and thoughtful data interpretation are stressed. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI364

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI364 Developmental Biology (*R*)

    Building a viable multicellular organism from a single fertilized egg involves the coordination of many biological processes. This course studies the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in embryogenesis with an emphasis on the processes that establish axis orientation of an embryo, specify the fate of stem cells, and regulate the formation of organ systems. Inherent in the field of developmental biology is the comparison of these processes across a variety of species in their evolutionary context. Emphasizing experimental design and technical writing, this course focuses on applying modern and canonical laboratory techniques using live animal models. Students who have completed this course qualify for BI416 Anatomy and Physiology II, but it is also possible to take this course following BI416, if the student wishes. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI370

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI370 Evolution

    In this course, students gain an appreciation for evolution as a process that is relevant to their everyday lives. Students learn to identify and quantify variation in populations and understand sources of variation. Basic evolutionary processes are studied including natural selection, mutation, drift, and migration. The course concludes with the study of speciation, phylogeny, and other selected topics. NOTE: Students may take either this course or BI402 Evolution with Advanced Topics, but not both.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      BI374

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI374 Ecology (*R*)

    In this course students study ecology at the level of the organism, population, community, and ecosystem. Special emphasis is given to quantifying population growth and interspecific interactions, including predator-prey, and competitive relationships. Labs are designed to expose students to working with live organisms, seeing ecological patterns in the field, and quantifying ecological variables. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      BI390

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI390 Research Experience in Biology (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in biology. During the first part of the course students learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings in a written paper. In addition, students read and discuss scientific literature, including publications of local professional scientists. When possible, a local scientist joins us in the laboratory for a hands-on, directed experiment. The second portion of the course is devoted to working in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: microbiology, biotechnology, enzyme studies, food science, neurobiology), or from topics proposed by the student if appropriate. Students then write a final paper describing their research and make a formal oral and visual presentation of their findings. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI400

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BI374 Ecology.
    Related Links: BI374

    BI400 Aquatic Ecology (*R*)

    Aquatic ecology is the study of abiotic and biotic factors that influence the structure and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. It includes the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of streams, lakes, estuaries, and intertidal zones. Special emphasis is placed on interactions between abiotic and biotic factors, energy flow in food webs, and the role of humans in altering aquatic ecosystems. Students learn about ongoing research in aquatic ecology and gain experience making field observations, designing experiments, and analyzing data to test hypotheses. Regular outdoor experiences, both on and off campus, expose students to a variety of aquatic ecosystems. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab, plus 1 required Saturday trip to the beach.

  •      BI402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI402 Evolution with Advanced Topics (*M*)

    In this course students learn about genetics at the population level and start the course by identifying and quantifying variation in populations. Evolutionary processes, such as natural selection, drift, mutation, migration, and non-random mating are studied alone and in all possible combinations. Students explore how natural selection produces adaptations at the morphological and molecular levels. The course concludes with a study of macro evolutionary patterns including speciation. In contrast to BI370 Evolution, this course is faster-paced, places more emphasis on mathematical models, and requires more independent learning. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills. NOTE: Students may take either this course or BI370 Evolution, but not both.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI404 Climate Change Biology (*M*)

    Climate change biology is the study of the impact of climate change on natural systems with emphasis on understanding the interactions between biological systems and the climate system. The goal of climate change biology is the development of management techniques designed to preserve natural systems. Students study past climate-biological systems interactions, currently observed changes, biological theory, and modeling in order to develop an understanding of possible mitigation and management approaches. Students enrolling in this course should have strong mathematical and problem-solving skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI404

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Biology or Ecology

    BI404 Honors Climate Change Biology

    Climate Change Biology is the study of the impact of climate change on natural systems in the environment with emphasis on understanding the interactions between biological systems and the climate system. The goal of climate change biology is the development of management techniques designed to preserve natural systems. Students study past climate-biological systems interactions, currently observed changes, biological theory, and modeling in order to develop an understanding of possible mitigation and management approaches.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Tuesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Required

  •      BI406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion, with a course grade of B- or higher in at least one course from either the Human Body or Cellular Biology course strands (BI352, BI360, BI364, BI410, BI416, BI422, BI434, BI436, BI438).
    Related Links: BI352, BI360, BI364, BI410, BI416, BI422, BI434, BI436, BI438, EB2

    BI406 Neuroscience (*R*)

    The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the biological basis of behavior at cellular, systems, and organismal levels. This course enables students to understand the physiological and anatomical mechanisms underlying complex behaviors such as sensory input, motor control, animals as model organisms for human behavior, auditory and visual perception, higher order processing, and memory. The course will provide an entry into how scientists attempt to understand the complexity of our human experience as sentient biological entities. This course emphasizes group work through a significant amount of independent project work. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BI356 Sports Kinesiology or permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: BI356

    BI408 Sports Kinesiology II

    This course continues the study of the skeleton and muscular structure and function of the lower extremity human body begun in BI356 Sports Kinesiology I. Topics include origins, insertions, action and nerve innervation of muscles in the body, along with in depth study of the skeletal upper extremity, some discussion of cranial nerves, spinal column, pelvic cavity and urinary systems.The gym-based laboratory component of this course puts special emphasis on the function and action of these muscles, with hands on palpation of other students.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Parental permission is required for a field trip to a human cadaver lab.

  •      BI410

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit

    BI410 Molecular and Cellular Biology

    The first portion of this course examines biochemical principles and the structure and properties of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Students then examine cellular structure and function common to most eukaryotic organisms. Topics include cellular components, membrane function, energetics, and enzyme function. Laboratory activities are designed to develop critical thinking skills and thoughtful data interpretation.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      BI416

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): BI352 Anatomy and Physiology I, or BI356 Sports Kinesiology I, or BI364 Developmental Biology, or BI410 Molecular and Cellular Biology, or BI434 AP Biology (I), or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: BI352, BI364, BI410, BI434, BI356

    BI416 Anatomy and Physiology II (*R*)

    Building upon the concepts learned in BI352 Anatomy and Physiology I, and emphasizing experimental design and scientific writing, this course provides an in-depth study of the processes needed to maintain human health. Major themes include homeostasis, the disease-state, and the major organ systems discussed in BI352 Anatomy and Physiology I, with particular emphasis on nervous and endocrine control mechanisms. The laboratory component of the course explores physiological concepts via experimentation. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI422

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): BI360 Molecular Genetics, or BI410 Molecular and Cellular Biology, or BI434 AP Biology (I) with a grade of B- or higher or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: BI360, BI410, BI434

    BI422 Immunology (*R*)

    This course extends the concepts of molecular and cellular biology to focus upon the mechanisms that compose the immune system. We begin with the general properties and development of immunity and proceed to generation of B-cell and T-cell responses, immune effector mechanisms and the immune system in health and disease. Specific topics include expression of immunoglobulin genes, hypersensitivity, leukocyte migration and inflammation, AIDS and other immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, transplantation immunology, and vaccines. This course is fast-paced and requires independent learning outside of class. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI424

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): One course in biology and one course in chemistry, or one course in biology and one trimester of NCSSM chemistry, or permission of the Dean of Science.

    BI424 AP Environmental Science (I)

    This course focuses on the study of natural Earth processes in order to understand how these processes have grown interdependent over millennia to form a life-supporting and balanced Earth system. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this course, the laboratory and field components include a variety of activities from analysis of existing data sets to experimental design.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI426

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): BI424 AP Environmental Science (I)
    Related Links: BI424

    BI426 AP Environmental Science (II)

    This course continues the study of the environment with emphasis on the effect of human activity on the Earth's natural processes in order to consider how economic development and human activity can be practiced in a sustainable manner. Many of the field trips and labs are off campus and outdoors. Students who master the concepts covered in both trimesters of environmental science are prepared for the AP Environmental Science examination.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI434

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Juniors - completion of a general biology course and a chemistry course in 9th or 10th grade with a grade of A or higher. Seniors - completion of general biology course and a chemistry course with a final grade of B or higher, or permission of the Dean of Science. Each course in the sequence is prerequisite for the next course.

    BI434 AP Biology (I) (*R*)

    This course is a survey of all areas of biology. It is divided into three terms. In BI434 students investigate molecular and cellular biology as well as Mendelian genetics. BI436 includes DNA science, evolutionary biology, and phylogeny. BI438 covers organisms and populations. This course has a strong laboratory emphasis, which includes the twelve laboratories suggested by the AP. Each of these courses includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI436

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): BI434 AP Biology (I)
    Related Links: BI434

    BI436 AP Biology (II) (*R*)

    This course is a survey of all areas of biology. It is divided into three terms. In BI434 students investigate molecular and cellular biology as well as Mendelian genetics. BI436 includes DNA science, evolutionary biology, and phylogeny. BI438 covers organisms and populations. This course has a strong laboratory emphasis, which includes the twelve laboratories suggested by the AP. Each of these courses includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI438

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): BI434 AP Biology (I) and BI436 AP Biology (II)
    Related Links: BI436

    BI438 AP Biology (III) (*R*)

    This course is a survey of all areas of biology. It is divided into three terms. In BI434 students investigate molecular and cellular biology as well as Mendelian genetics. BI436 includes DNA science, evolutionary biology, and phylogeny. BI438 covers organisms and populations. This course has a strong laboratory emphasis, which includes the twelve laboratories suggested by the AP. Each of these courses includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      BI442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in the Winter trimester.

    BI442 Research in Biology I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second trimester junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in biological research. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus or in the Triangle area. Students with a final grade of B or higher are expected to continue in BI444 Research in Biology II. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      BI444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in BI442 Research in Biology I, or successful participation in a summer research program, and permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: BI442

    BI444 Research in Biology II (*R*)

    Students write a detailed research proposal and defend it to a panel of their peers. Students begin to learn techniques and to gather data for their experiments. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      BI446

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in BI444 Research in Biology II and permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: BI444

    BI446 Research in Biology III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions. This course includes a significant research component.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      BI448

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core biology or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in BI446 Research in Biology III and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: BI446

    BI448 Research in Biology IV (*R*)

    Students in this course have a leadership role in working with students enrolled in BI442 Research in Biology I. Students are responsible for mentoring these incoming students, participating in discussion groups, and assisting with special projects as requested by the instructor. In addition, each student is responsible for creating and presenting a lesson on some aspect of scientific methodology.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      CH305

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry

    This survey chemistry course includes atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, physical properties, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Emphasis is on developing inquiry skills required for learning science along with specific reading and writing, problem solving, and technology applications. A review of pertinent math skills accompanies each topic as needed. The course includes a strong laboratory component that encompasses many laboratory techniques.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    This is a 3-trimester sequence.

  •      CH353

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2

    CH353 Chemistry

    This course provides a thorough treatment of chemical principles using a college-level textbook. It is a rigorous course that covers the fundamental concepts (atomic theory, chemical bonding, molecular structure, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, kinetics theory, chemical equilibrium, acid bases, and electrochemistry.) However, it requires less preparation in mathematics than does CH401 AP Chemistry (I). Students who earn a course grade of A or higher in CH353 Chemistry may request permission of the Dean of Science to take CH402 AP Chemistry (II).

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CH353 with a grade of B- or higher or permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH353

    CH354 CH354 Chemistry/Adv Topics

    This course is designed for students who already have a mastery of the basic concepts of chemistry. Mass spectroscopy, free energy, organic chemistry, and other advanced topics are included. Students are exposed to instrumentation and computation as part of their lab skills development. Activities and labs are designed to provide opportunities for students to develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they learn to design and conduct chemistry projects, as well as to become independent learners. Students who have successfully completed the first two trimesters of CH353 and are interested in advanced topics, or who are considering taking a chemistry subject standardized exam such at the SAT subject test or AP exam should enroll.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of a high school chemistry course

    CH360 Topics in Chemistry

    This course offers the opportunity for deeper exploration of a particular area of chemistry not covered in other chemistry offerings. The focus, whenever the course is offered, varies and is announced when course offerings are published

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab

  •      CH390

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    CH390 Research Experience in Chemistry (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in chemistry. During the first part of the course students learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings in a written paper. In addition, students read and discuss scientific literature, including publications of local professional scientists. When possible, a local scientist joins us in the laboratory for a hands-on, directed experiment. The second portion of the course is devoted to working in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: nutrition, renewable energy, air pollution, water pollution, recycling, sustainable science, environmental science), or from topics proposed by the student if appropriate. Students then write a final paper describing their research and make a formal oral and visual presentation of their findings.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab

  •      CH401

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    CH401 AP Chemistry (I)

    This course, like CH353 Chemistry, covers the fundamental concepts of chemistry. It uses a college-level textbook and moves at a faster pace than CH353, thereby covering additional topics and treating many areas in greater depth. Students should have strong math and abstract reasoning skills. Students interested in taking the AP Chemistry examination should enroll in CH402 AP Chemistry (II) if they meet the prerequisites.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CH401 AP Chemistry (I) with a course grade of B- or higher, or completion of CH353 Chemistry with a course grade of A- or higher, or permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH401b, CH353b

    CH402 AP Chemistry (II)

    This course provides students with additional topics and depth not covered in CH401. Emphasis is on completion of the AP chemistry curriculum along with further development of laboratory and problem solving skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH405

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry, or CH353 Chemistry, or completion of an honors chemistry class and permission of the Dean of Science.

    CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I)

    This course is designed for students who already have a mastery of the basic concepts of chemistry. Molecular orbital theory, complex ions and other advanced topics are included. Students are also exposed to instrumentation and computation as part of their lab skills development. Activities and labs are designed to provide opportunities for students to develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they learn to design and conduct chemistry projects, as well as to become independent learners. Students who have successfully completed the first two trimesters and plan to take the AP Chemistry examination should enroll in CH406 AP Chemistry (Advanced II) during third trimester.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I) with a grade of B- or higher or permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH405b

    CH406 AP Chemistry (Advanced II)

    This course provides students with additional topics and depth not covered in CH405. Emphasis is on completion of the AP chemistry curriculum along with further development of laboratory and problem solving skills. Additionally, students have the opportunity to complete a chemistry project.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CH408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of A- or higher in CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry or CH353 Chemistry, or final grade of B or higher in CH401 AP Chemistry (I) or CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I), or exemption from NCSSM core chemistry requirement and permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH408 Analytical Chemistry

    This course examines the analysis of compounds using different separation and purification techniques including, but not limited to thin-layer, ion-exchange, and gel-filtration chromatography as well as instrumental analysis techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV-VIS), atomic absorption spectrosophy (AA) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The laboratory component is an important part of the course and special emphasis is placed on the analysis of biochemical compounds.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CH410

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of any NCSSM general chemistry course with a grade of B or higher or exemption from NCSSM core chemistry requirement and permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH410 Organic Chemistry

    This course introduces students to the structure, synthesis, and reactions of the major functional groups present in organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and the prediction of products are covered. The laboratory involves synthetic and separation techniques and the use of physical and instrumental methods of verifying the products of reactions. Most of the experiments are performed at a micro scale level.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH410

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Honors and/or AP Chemistry with grade of B or higher

    CH410 Honors Organic Chemistry

    This course introduces students to the structure, synthesis, and reactions of the major functional groups present in organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and the prediction of products are covered. Instrumental methods of verifying the products of reactions will be investigated.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 7:30pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Required
    Spring Semester: Wednesday 7:30pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Required

  •      CH412

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): Honors Chemistry

    CH412 Honors Intro to Computational Chemistry

    This course is designed to teach students the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science. The course will benefit students who are interested in any area of study that uses chemistry (including subjects such as environmental science, medicine, biology, materials science, nanotechnology, etc.). This is essentially a course in quantum chemistry, and is one of the most challenging courses in the sequence. NCSSM is one of the only high schools in the country that teaches a formal course in computational chemistry. This course is typically offered at the upper undergraduate/graduate at most universities, and requires a strong chemistry background and at least 12 to 14 hours/week of dedicated time. Recommended for fall, senior year.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Thursday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Students should have a reasonable mathematics background, preferably at the algebra level or higher. Ability to work in a computing environment is important in doing computational chemistry. Students will spend a considerable number of hours interacting with the computer in this course. This course uses a significant amount of specialized software, all of which is provided free of charge, either by NCSSM or by the creators of that software. Students must be able to install software on the computers used for these courses, sometimes on short notice! If using a school computer, students must ensure that the school will allow them to install specialized software on a school machine. There are no paper/pencil alternate activities. Students must ensure that a backup machine is available if their primary machine is not available

  •      CH414

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Honors Chemistry, Algebra

    CH414 Honors Computational Medicinal Chemistry

    Computational Medicinal Chemistry is the study of how new drugs are developed and tested. Students will learn the basic concepts and methods used by medicinal chemists. In the process of doing so, basic and advanced concepts in chemistry, biology, mathematics, and computing will be learned and applied to one or more medicinal chemistry problems. As such, this is an applied course: students will be expected to apply their knowledge of the basic sciences to medicinal chemistry challenges of increasing difficulty. This course makes significant use of computer modeling (computational chemistry). NCSSM is one of the only high schools in the country that teaches a formal course in medicinal chemistry. Like computational chemistry, this course is typically offered at the upper undergraduate/graduate level, requires a strong chemistry and biology background, and at least 12 to 14 hours/week of dedicated time. Recommended for spring, senior year.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Thursday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Successful students need a strong working background of chemical kinetics. Students should also have reasonable mathematics background, preferably at the algebra level or higher. A solid background in biology, particularly protein science, is recommended. Students will spend a considerable number of hours interacting with the computer in this course. This course uses a significant amount of specialized software, all of which is provided free of charge, either by NCSSM or by the creators of that software. Students must be able to install software on the computers used for these courses, sometimes on short notice! If using a school computer, students must ensure that the school will allow them to install specialized software on a school machine. There are no paper/pencil alternate activities. Students must ensure that a backup machine is available if their primary machine is not available.

  •      CH416

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry, CH353 Chemistry, CH401 AP Chemistry (I), or CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I) or permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH416 Environmental Chemistry

    This course focuses on the chemistry associated with topics of environmental concern such as acid rain, photochemical smog, global warming, and water and land pollution. Principles of sustainable development are addressed within each of these topics, and solutions that may contribute to a sustainable future are discussed. Laboratory activities include field and sampling trips that focus on the fate of chemicals in the environment. A service-learning component enables students to apply their knowledge and understanding to the solution of a local or regional environmental problem.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH418

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of A- or higher in CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry or CH353 Chemistry, or final grade of B or higher in CH401 AP Chemistry (I) or CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I), or final grade of B or higher in CH410 Organic Chemistry, or exemption from the NCSSM core chemistry requirement and permission of the Dean of Science. Completion of an NCSSM biology course is recommended but not required
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH418 Biochemistry (*R*)

    This course introduces students to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical structure and dynamic interactions of the four major classes of biological macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Students examine the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymes and explore how enzymes catalyze reactions in the cell. In the laboratory, students learn important biochemical techniques required to purify a protein and to analyze enzyme kinetics and protein-ligand interactions.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH420

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of any NCSSM general chemistry course with a grade of B or higher or exemption from NCSSM core chemistry requirement, and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH420 Introduction to Applied Chemistry and Engineering

    This course provides a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary overview of the global chemical industry, covering the chemical synthesis of major inorganic and organic products, chemical engineering concepts, and history and economics of the chemical industry. Four-member student teams conduct a trimester-long product development lab designed to meet product requirements determined via consumer market analysis. Students gain a broad understanding of the international chemical industry and of chemical engineering, acquire practical, real world experience with the product development process, and develop problem-solving skills within a teamwork model.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH422

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of any NCSSM general chemistry course with a grade of B or higher or exemption from NCSSM core chemistry requirement, and permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH422 Polymer Chemistry

    This course is an introduction to polymer science. Its scope includes fundamental principles of bonding as related to macromolecules and important structure-property relationships. Laboratory work includes natural polymer modification, synthesis of linear and cross-linked polymers, characterization of polymers using infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and viscosity measurements.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH428

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of A- or higher in CH305 Chemistry by Inquiry or CH353 Chemistry, or final grade of B or higher in CH401 AP Chemistry (I) or CH405 AP Chemistry (Advanced I), or exemption from NCSSM core chemistry requirement, and permission of the Dean of Science
    Related Links: CH305c, CH353b, CH401b, CH405b, EC1, EC2

    CH428 Materials Chemistry (*R*)

    This course explores the connection between material properties and the underlying chemical phenomena on which those properties depend. We examine the structure-function relationships that give rise to properties such as conductivity, elasticity, optical response, and material strength. In both the classroom and the laboratory, we explore polymers, inorganic semiconductors, ceramics and glasses, organic electronics (photovoltaics, batteries, LEDs), and more. We also consider special topics in surface chemical phenomena, responsive materials, and nanomaterials.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      CH430

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): None

    CH430 Honors Nanotechnology & Research

    This course provides a broad overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology, driven primarily by the use of advanced computational technologies, techniques, and tools. Using highly specialized software, students will explore topics such as nanofibers, optical LED lights, metallic organic frameworks (MOFs), and other topics that are currently at the cutting edge of science! This is also an introductory research course, so students will read the professional (primary) scientific literature, and write multiple papers (4-6) using the LaTeX publication typesetting language.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Monday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Students should have a reasonable mathematics background, preferably at the algebra level or higher. Ability to work in a computing environment is important in doing this course. Students will spend a considerable number of hours interacting with the computer in this course. This course uses a significant amount of specialized software, all of which is provided free of charge, either by NCSSM or by the creators of that software. Students must be able to install software on the computers used for these courses, sometimes on short notice! If using a school computer, students must ensure that the school will allow them to install specialized software on a school machine. There are no paper/pencil alternate activities. Students must ensure that a backup machine is available if their primary machine is not available.

  •      CH442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in the Winter trimester.

    CH442 Research Chem I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second or third trimester junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn scientific methodology and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write their own research proposals on a problem of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in scientific research. Based on the outcomes of the semester's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus or in the Triangle area. Students with a final grade of B or higher are encouraged to continue in CH444 Research in Chemistry II.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      CH444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CH442
    Related Links: CH442

    CH444 Research Chem II (*R*)

    In this course, students continue to gather and analyze experimental data based on their previous term and/or summer work. Time is devoted to the completion of the research project and a written paper. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other state and national competitions.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      CH446

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CH444
    Related Links: CH444

    CH446 Research Chem III (*R*)

    In this course, students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and analysis, as needed, or to research extension questions based on their original work. Students in this course have a leadership role in working with the junior students enrolled in CH442 Research in Chemistry I.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      CH448

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Chemistry
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CH446
    Related Links: CH446

    CH448 Research Chem IV (*R*)

    In this course, students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and analysis, as needed, or to research extension questions based on their original work. Students in this course have a leadership role in working with the junior students enrolled in CH442 Research in Chemistry I and may serve as teaching assistants.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      CN305

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    CN305 Introductory Chinese

    Introductory Chinese is designed for those who have never spoken or studied the language and for non-native Mandarin speakers with up to one year of previous study in the language. This course provides students with the fundamentals for learning to understand, speak, and begin to read and write Mandarin Chinese. The course focuses on developing accurate pronunciation and tones, learning to understand the spoken language in context, and developing a foundation of basic sentence patterns, questions, and everyday vocabulary. The sound system (pinyin and tones) and the writing system (radicals and stroke order) are presented in detail. Reading is used to support and reinforce the acquisition of the spoken language. The course is proficiency-based and focus is on the development of listening and speaking skills. By the third trimester, class is conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN307

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): CN305 Introductory Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN305c

    CN307 Intermediate Chinese

    Intermediate Chinese is designed for students who are able to carry out basic conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics, have mastery of pinyin and stroke order, and read stories comprising 100 high-frequency characters. The focus continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills, with the specific goals of expanding vocabulary and exposing students to more complex sentence patterns. There is an additional focus on word/character analysis and reading strategies, composition skills, and cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based, and class is conducted entirely in Chinese. A special feature of the course is a weekly shared virtual classroom with a high school in China. Students thus have the opportunity to engage in educational and cultural exchange with their counterparts in China.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CN354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN307 Intermediate Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN307c

    CN354 Advanced Chinese I

    Advanced Chinese is designed for students who grew up hearing or speaking Mandarin, as well as for non-Chinese heritage students who have studied Mandarin as a second language at school. Students are placed in this course if they are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The primary focus of the course is on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to expand their listening and speaking skills. Selected vocabulary and sentence patterns are introduced in order to support students' discussion of a broader range of topics in a more formal manner. Reading and writing are used to reinforce new language skills and explore cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN356

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN354 Advanced Chinese or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN354

    CN356 Advanced Chinese II

    Advanced Chinese is designed for students who grew up hearing or speaking Mandarin, as well as for non-Chinese heritage students who have studied Mandarin as a second language at school. Students are placed in this course if they are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The primary focus of the course is on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to expand their listening and speaking skills. Selected vocabulary and sentence patterns are introduced in order to support students' discussion of a broader range of topics in a more formal manner. Reading and writing are used to reinforce new language skills and explore cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN356 Advanced Chinese II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN356

    CN358 Advanced Chinese III

    Advanced Chinese is designed for students who grew up hearing or speaking Mandarin, as well as for non-Chinese heritage students who have studied Mandarin as a second language at school. Students are placed in this course if they are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics. The primary focus of the course is on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to expand their listening and speaking skills. Selected vocabulary and sentence patterns are introduced in order to support students' discussion of a broader range of topics in a more formal manner. Reading and writing are used to reinforce new language skills and explore cultural understanding. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN358 Advanced Chinese III or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN358

    CN404 Readings in Chinese with Topics I

    Readings in Chinese with Topics is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics and read stories comprising mostly high frequency words and basic sentence structures. The course focuses on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to strengthen their listening and speaking skills. Expanding vocabulary and sentence patterns are also key goals in this course. By building these skills, students will further develop their ability to discuss various topics in a more sophisticated way. Students will also expand their cultural knowledge and language skills through reading and writing. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN404 Readings in Chinese with Topics I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN404

    CN406 Readings in Chinese with Topics II

    Readings in Chinese with Topics is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics and read stories comprising mostly high frequency words and basic sentence structures. The course focuses on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to strengthen their listening and speaking skills. Expanding vocabulary and sentence patterns are also key goals in this course. By building these skills, students will further develop their ability to discuss various topics in a more sophisticated way. Students will also expand their cultural knowledge and language skills through reading and writing. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN406 Readings in Chinese with Topics II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN406

    CN408 Readings in Chinese with Topics III

    Readings in Chinese with Topics is designed for students who are able to comfortably carry on extended conversations in Mandarin about everyday topics and read stories comprising mostly high frequency words and basic sentence structures. The course focuses on developing students' reading and writing abilities, while continuing to strengthen their listening and speaking skills. Expanding vocabulary and sentence patterns are also key goals in this course. By building these skills, students will further develop their ability to discuss various topics in a more sophisticated way. Students will also expand their cultural knowledge and language skills through reading and writing. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN454

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN408 Readings in Chinese with Topics III or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN408

    CN454 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics I

    Advanced Readings in Chinese is designed for students who are able to converse in Mandarin in more extended and complex ways and to read simple Chinese writings. Students develop and expand their speaking and listening abilities to make formal presentations, to narrate, discuss, debate, and persuade. Students also read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history, and modern life. Students improve their composition skills through regular writing assignments. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural differences and similarities between China and the West. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN456

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN454 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN454

    CN456 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics II

    Advanced Readings in Chinese is designed for students who are able to converse in Mandarin in more extended and complex ways and to read simple Chinese writings. Students develop and expand their speaking and listening abilities to make formal presentations, to narrate, discuss, debate, and persuade. Students also read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history, and modern life. Students improve their composition skills through regular writing assignments. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural differences and similarities between China and the West. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CN458

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CN456 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: CN456

    CN458 Advanced Readings in Chinese with Topics III

    Advanced Readings in Chinese is designed for students who are able to converse in Mandarin in more extended and complex ways and to read simple Chinese writings. Students develop and expand their speaking and listening abilities to make formal presentations, to narrate, discuss, debate, and persuade. Students also read authentic materials on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture, history, and modern life. Students improve their composition skills through regular writing assignments. The basics of Classical Chinese are introduced. Students deepen their cross-cultural communication skills by continuing to observe and compare cultural differences and similarities between China and the West. The course is proficiency-based and conducted entirely in Chinese.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      CS302

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Credits: One unit of core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    CS302 Programming with Engineering Applications

    This course uses concepts from engineering and science to inspire students to learn basic programming skills that are widely used in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Students use a spreadsheet and, later, Mathematica to create models of a variety of systems, including dynamic systems, heat loss from buildings, and drinking water systems. Good modeling practice, means of assessing accuracy, and the display of modeling results are important parts of the course. The course includes online and in-class skills building, implementation of classic modeling examples, and a final project in which the student investigates an area of his/her own choosing.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week, including lab or three periods per week including lab and an additional asynchronous online component.

  •      CS358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science OR core mathematics credit

    CS358 Cryptography

    Crosslisted as MA358. This course introduces students to cryptographic methods used to encipher and decipher secret messages with an emphasis on using computer programming to automate the process. Through class discussions, problem solving, group activities, and programming assignments, students will learn a variety of encryption schemes ranging from the age of Caesar to modern public key encryption used to secure digital communications online. Students will learn introductory number theory and statistics to describe these methods and identify weaknesses that allow secret messages to be read without the key. Students will also master programming topics such as variables, functions, conditional logic, looping and recursion, and file input/output in the Python language to implement each cryptographic method. This course will utilize a blended learning environment with large portions of material being taught online and utilizing in class time for working in groups. Students will receive one unit of credit for this course, but the course will satisfy both the mathematics and engineering/computer science course requirement.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS358

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2

    CS358 Honors Cryptography

    This course introduces students to cryptographic methods used to encipher and decipher secret messages with an emphasis on using computer programming to automate the process. Through class discussions, problem solving, group activities, and programming assignments, students will learn a variety of encryption schemes ranging from the age of Caesar to modern public key encryption used to secure digital communications online. Students will learn introductory number theory and statistics to describe these methods and identify weaknesses that allow secret messages to be read without the key. Students will also master programming topics such as variables, functions, conditional logic, looping and recursion, and file input/output in the Python language to implement each cryptographic method. This course will utilize a blended learning environment with large portions of material being taught online and utilizing in class time for working in groups. Students will receive one unit of credit for this course, but the course will satisfy both the mathematics and engineering/computer science course requirement.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester(Trimester 1): Wednesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: September 29, 2019/ Optional
    Spring Semester (Trimester 3): Wednesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      CS360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One credit of Engineering and Computer Science or one core elective credit

    CS360 /AR360 Art, Technology, and Computing

    This course asks students to expand on their definition of art to include technology as a platform for creativity. Students will be introduced to the resources in NCSSM's FabLab and our new Creative Technology Lab, which houses a Virtual Reality Painting Studio, and to a variety of other digital applications and equipment. Students will also learn electronics and programming to enable the use of the Arduino electronic platform to sense the environment and respond with light, sound, and motion. Students will have the time to develop their skills on their choice of state-of-the-art equipment while bringing their creative ideas into existence. The goal of this course is to develop and expand on creative skills and construct an innovative and interactive work of art. Through slide presentations, readings and class discussions, students will gain knowledge and appreciation of art history while becoming more familiar with artists who are working with groundbreaking methods and materials. Programming concepts such as objects, variables, functions, conditional logic, and iteration are important concepts, taught in the context of artistic expression, which allow this course to serve as a prerequisite for more advanced computer science courses. This course also satisfies the graduation requirement in Engineering and Computer Science.

    Meeting Times:
    Four days per week including lab, or could be modified if flexible scheduling is allowed (ideally 3 times per week)

  •      CS402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit of core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    CS402 Web Development

    This beginning course introduces the basic ideas of computing via the WWW through the creation of dynamic web pages. Three layers are built: HTML, for document structure, CSS for document appearance, and JavaScript for page behavior. JavaScript, a full-featured, Turing-complete programming language, is used to learn the fundamental components of programming: variables, objects, functions, conditional logic, and iteration. In-class individual and group work culminates in an individual project chosen by the students.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit of core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    CS404 Game Design and Simulation

    Students will apply proper game design techniques to developing playable games in multiple formats. This includes developing an idea of what makes a game fun, and having rules and environments that support users to feel that the game experience is pleasing yet challenging, with the MDA (Mechanics, Dynamics, Aesthetics) format. Students will learn foundational programming concepts with Ruby and associated libraries and use it to develop a text adventure game, 2D, and 3D programs and simulations. A culminating final project will be developed to showcase game development knowledge and skill set. This course serves as a prerequisite (it covers all skills required) for taking more advanced CS courses at NCSSM.

    Meeting Times:
    Four days per week including lab

  •      CS406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit of core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    CS406 Scientific Programming

    This course teaches computer programming skills and how to apply them for analyzing, interpreting, and displaying both large and small scientific data sets. Using Python, MATLAB, R, Mathmatica, and associated software libraries, students learn to access data sets, write programs to calculate and manipulate data, display data, and perform basic statistical analysis. Programming concepts such as objects, variables, functions, conditional logic, and iterations are important concepts that are taught in the context of scientific programming and which allow this course to serve as a prerequisite for more advanced courses. The course features a final project allowing students to explore datasets in scientific areas of interest to them.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS406

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2

    CS406 Honors Introduction to Scientific Programming

    This course teaches computer programming skills and how to apply them for analyzing, interpreting, and displaying both large and small scientific data sets. Using Python, MATLAB, R, Mathmatica, and associated software libraries, students learn to access data sets, write programs to calculate and manipulate data, display data, and perform basic statistical analysis. Programming concepts such as objects, variables, functions, conditional logic, and iterations are important concepts that are taught in the context of scientific programming and which allow this course to serve as a prerequisite for more advanced courses. The course features a final project allowing students to explore datasets in scientific areas of interest to them.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Thursday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      CS422

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Prior programming experience. Includes: CS302 Programming with Engineering Applications, CS402 Web Development, CS406 Scientific Programming, EE316 Introductory Robotics, CS358 Cryptography, or adequate score on the computer science placement exam
    Related Links: CS302, CS402, CS406, EE316, CS358, MA358

    CS422 Databases

    Databases are everywhere, and they come in many flavors. They are not just in obvious places like Facebook and Twitter. There are also hundreds of databases installed on the phone in your hand. You may find that your life would be easier if you were able to build a few of them yourself. This course introduces students to basic database concepts, gives them experience using databases for real-world applications, and demonstrates how one size most certainly does not fit all. Topics include: relational databases, SQL wizardry, database design, object-relational mappers (ActiveRecord in Ruby on Rails), and scalability.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS424

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS302 Programming with Engineering Applications, CS402 Web Development, CS406 Scientific Programming, EE316 Introductory Robotics, CS358 Cryptography, or by placement test.
    Related Links: CS402, CS302, CS406, EE316, CS358, MA358

    CS424 Procedural Programming

    This intermediate course focuses on building programming skill and gaining exposure to advanced topics such as recursion, object-oriented programming, and regular expressions. Students gain experience in writing programs using multiple procedures to solve complex problems. After learning the Python programming language, students work on multiple projects of increasing complexity.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS426

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS424 Procedural Programming, by placement test, or score of 4 or 5 on AP Computer Science A exam.
    Related Links: CS424

    CS426 Java

    This course assumes a firm command of procedure writing and object-based programming. It begins by introducing the basic programming constructs in Java, along with Java's type system. Students learn how to read the Java API documentation and they also learn how to create a simple application programming interface. Students are then introduced to object-oriented programming, including such things as inheritance, abstract classes, interfaces, and functional interfaces. These constructs are applied to writing event-driven programs that have a graphical user interface. Several projects of increasing complexity are completed.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS428

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS426 Java or by placement test.
    Related Links: CS426

    CS428 Advanced Java

    This course assumes knowledge of the object-oriented aspects of the Java programming language and of event-driven programming. Data structures and algorithms are applied to create applications that handle and process data. Students learn about creating generic container classes from scratch, as well as learning about the Java Collections framework and the Streams API.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS432

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS424 Procedural Programming or Placement Exam
    Related Links: CS424

    CS432 Machine Learning

    This course teaches basic machine learning concepts, algorithms and their applications using Python and associated software libraries. Machine learning concepts include where ML fits within AI, Data Science, and Statistics, where ML is being commonly used, and the larger societal context including possible ethical concerns. Machine learning techniques include supervised learning, unsupervised learning, and reinforcement learning. Applications may include implementation of decision trees, neural networks, and other frameworks. This course features a final project allowing students to apply machine learning techniques to a problem of interest to them. This course requires advanced programming skill and expects mastery of the Python programming language as evidenced by meeting the course prerequisite or by placement exam.

    Meeting Times:
    Four days per week including lab

  •      CS434

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS424 Procedural Programming, by placement test, or score of 4 or 5 on AP Computer Science A exam.
    Related Links: CS424

    CS434 C

    This course is a low-level introduction to the C programming language, including pointers, pointer arithmetic, and memory management. Students learn to use valgrind and gdb to debug programs, eliminate segmentation faults, and detect memory leaks. Several projects and case studies incorporating the list model are performed and analyzed using Big-O notation.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS436

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS434 C or by placement test.
    Related Links: CS434

    CS436 Data Structures

    Students use the C programming language to study and implement basic data structures, including trees, expression trees, and search trees and the relevant algorithms and applications. Student choose and implement a case study of a related advanced topic.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS438

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): CS434 C or by placement test.
    Related Links: CS424

    CS438 Algorithms

    Students use the C programming language to study and implement basic data structures, including heaps, priority queues, and hash tables and the relevant algorithms and applications. Students choose and implement a case study of a related advanced topic.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      CS490

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.

    CS490 Advanced Computer Science Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in computer science to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in computer science or who wish to do independent research in computer science.

  •      CS492

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.

    CS492 Advanced Computer Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in computer science to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in computer science or who wish to do independent research in computer science.

  •      CS494

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Computer Science
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.

    CS494 Advanced Computer Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in computer science to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in computer science or who wish to do independent research in computer science.

  •      DR302

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    DR302 Theater Performance Workshop

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of acting and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Students survey several acting methods working as individuals and cooperative ensembles in the study of topics including voice, movement, improvisation, characterization, scene work, and text analysis for stage. As the course progresses, our study expands to skills in direction and technical design/operation. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. In addition, students enrolled are required to apply their classroom experience by participating in some capacity in the coinciding drama board theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    One 100-minute evening class meeting per week.

  •      DR304

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    DR304 Theater Performance Workshop

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of acting and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Students survey several acting methods working as individuals and cooperative ensembles in the study of topics including voice, movement, improvisation, characterization, scene work, and text analysis for stage. As the course progresses, our study expands to skills in direction and technical design/operation. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. In addition, students enrolled are required to apply their classroom experience by participating in some capacity in the coinciding drama board theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    One 100-minute evening class meeting per week.

  •      DR306

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Drama
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    DR306 Theater Performance Workshop

    This course focuses on the craft of stage performance beginning with rudiments of acting and building outwards to develop the skills and vocabulary of the theater artist. Students survey several acting methods working as individuals and cooperative ensembles in the study of topics including voice, movement, improvisation, characterization, scene work, and text analysis for stage. As the course progresses, our study expands to skills in direction and technical design/operation. During each class, students participate in acting exercises that include structured peer feedback and often require physical activity. In addition, students enrolled are required to apply their classroom experience by participating in some capacity in the coinciding drama board theatrical production. No previous experience is required. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    One 100-minute evening class meeting per week.

  •      EE308

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE308 History of Engineering and Technology

    This course explores the history of engineering and technology in its cultural, ethical, and scientific context. We focus on historical readings, projects, and labs to illuminate the development and relevance of this history.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      EE310

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit.

    EE310 CAD/CAM

    This course provides in-depth instruction in computer graphics. The goal of this course is to learn how to use computer-aided design (CAD) software to graphically represent two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects. This course emphasizes product design, assembly drawing, and exploded views. This course is well-suited to students considering a career in engineering or research, and for those students who wish to become more effective in visually communicating technical information in any profession. The final project is an original design of a functional object complete with all drawings necessary for its construction.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE316

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE316 Introductory Robotics

    This course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in basic programming and design using an autonomous LEGO EV3 robot and industry-level LabVIEW software. Students will explore the use of sensors to have the robot react to its environment and learn to troubleshoot mechanical and software issues. Self-guided skill development early in the trimester is followed by a series of project challenges emphasizing teamwork and design.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE318

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE318 Fundamentals of Engineering

    This course introduces students to the various fields of engineering, the engineering design process, and to core math and science concepts that encompass all fields of engineering. Students examine ethics in engineering and technical communication needed for successful engineering practices. Students engage in course content through multi-sensory, hands-on activities and projects in order to fully understand and apply the concepts covered. The course concludes with a capstone design project.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE356

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Math III or Integrated Math III with a B or higher

    EE356 Honors Civil & Environmental Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of civil and environmental engineering and to math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to these and other engineering disciplines. Topics include engineering design, statics and strength of materials, hydrology, pollutant fate and transport, and environmental modeling. Activities include small-scale laboratory explorations, design projects inspired by the profession, field measurement, online data acquisition and computational modeling.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesday 7:00pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Required
    Spring Semester: Tuesday 7:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Required

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Students should be able to relate lengths of sides of a triangle to angles using trigonometry.

  •      EE362

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE362 Engineering the Modern

    This course examines the transformations in engineering, science, and the arts that define the birth of Modernism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The visual arts, music, architecture, literature, engineering, science, and technology are examined against the background of historical and political events in order to comprehend the links between the arts, technology, engineering, and science. Topics include the construction of the Brooklyn and Eads Bridges, steel and the skyscraper, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Wright Brothers and the airplane, Einstein and Heisenberg, World War I's impact and technology, automation and the automobile, the computer, the movies, Dada, Kafka, Woolf, and the emergence of abstraction in art and atonality in music. Assessments for the course are designed to allow students to develop their analytical reasoning, critical thinking skills, and ability to communicate ideas across disciplines.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      EE370

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science credit.

    EE370 Biomechanics of Injury

    Biomechanics is an interdisciplinary field that describes, analyzes, and assesses human movement and the effects of forces on the body. As part of this course, students will learn the in-depth anatomy and physiology of the musculoskeletal system with special consideration given to lower extremities. Students will also investigate how physical laws affect human activity and how three major areas of biomechanics (movement, joint, and material mechanics) contribute to injuries such as fractures, dislocations, sprains, and strains. This course will integrate both lecture and lab components, as well as case studies, to engage students in qualitative and quantitative analysis of biomechanical principles in the context of the mechanism and care of sports injuries.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE390

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE390 Research Experience in Engineering

    This introductory course is for students who wish to pursue a research opportunity in engineering. Participants learn basic research skills in methodology, research design, and literature review. During the first part of the course students learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings in a written paper. In addition, students read and discuss research articles, including those of local professional engineers. When possible, a local engineer joins us in the laboratory for a hands-on, directed project. The second portion of the course is devoted to working in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: mechanical engineering, civil/environmental engineering, or biomechanics), or from topics proposed by the student if appropriate. Students then write a final paper describing their research project and make a formal oral presentation of their findings.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE400

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE400 Mechanical Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of mechanical engineering. Using activities, design projects, and laboratory modules students learn how engineers use mathematics and science to design efficient and beneficial devices such as automobiles, power plants, airplanes, machinery, and heating/cooling equipment. Topics include engineering design, simple machines, mechanisms, materials, dynamics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and modeling.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE402 Electrical Engineering

    This course introduces students to topics important to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Using activities, laboratory modules, and a major design project students learn first-hand how electrical engineers analyze and solve problems. Topics include basic DC and AC circuits, OpAmps, semiconductors, and logic design.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE404 Architecture

    This course introduces students to the field of architecture. Students use industry-standard software (Revit Architecture) to design buildings. Driven by hands-on projects and activities, this course covers topics such as architectural history, structural engineering, green building, project planning, site planning, building design, and project documentation. The final project is the design of a house for a client, giving students the opportunity to model the real-world experiences of architects.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE408 Biomedical Engineering

    This course introduces students to the different sub-specialties of biomedical engineering including biomaterials, biomechanics, bioelectricity, biomedical devices, and measurements, as well as design. Through hands-on labs, activities, and collaborative design projects students kinesthetically explore and experience biomedical engineering principles, the engineering design process, and problem solving and troubleshooting.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE408

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): B or better in Math II Honors, or an A in Math II.

    EE408 Honors Biomedical Engineering

    How are electrical signals from the heart measured outside the body? Is there a way to design high-heel shoes that don't hurt women's feet? How do engineers design heart valves that only allow blood to flow one way? This course introduces students to the different sub-specialties of biomedical engineering including bioelectronics and instrumentation, biomaterials, biomechanics, and biochemical. Through homework sets, hands-on lab activities, research article review, and design projects the students explore and experience biomedical engineering principles, the engineering design process, and problem solving and troubleshooting.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional
    Spring Semester: Tuesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Optional

  •      EE414

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Math III or Integrated Math III with a B or higher.

    EE414 Honors Aerospace Engineering

    This course introduces students to the field of aerospace engineering, engineering design, and the core math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to aerospace and other engineering disciplines. The course is presented in historical context with topics that include spatial reasoning, fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics, kinematics and the mechanics of flight. These principles are applied to the design and control of aircraft and spacecraft through small-scale physical design projects and computational modeling examples. Students have opportunities to experiment, calculate, compute, design and build as they explore and solve problems associated with the flight, and are encouraged to earn course credit through aerospace-themed projects of their own design.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Required
    Spring Semester: Tuesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Required

  •      EE414

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE414 Aerospace Engineering

    This course introduces students to the field of aerospace engineering, engineering design, and the core math and science concepts needed to solve problems related to aerospace and other engineering disciplines. The course is presented with historical context, emphasizing the development of human flight from antiquity through modern aviation and on into current and future exploration of space. Topics include spatial reasoning, properties of fluids, descriptions of 3-dimensional motion, the mechanics of flight, and basic aero- and thermodynamic principles applied to the design and control of aircraft and spacecraft. Students have opportunities to experiment, calculate, compute, design and build as they explore and solve problems associated with the mechanics of flight, and are encouraged to earn course credit through aerospace-themed projects of their own design.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE416

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE416 Civil Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of civil engineering. Using activities, design projects, and laboratory modules students learn first-hand how engineers use mathematics and science to solve problems in the context of societal needs and desires. Topics include the engineering design process, engineering math, applied and reactive forces and movements, strength of materials, stresses and buckling for structures in tension, compression, and bending, common construction materials, hydrostatic loading, and the mechanics and analysis of fluid transport. This course has an integrated structural design project covering many aspects of truss analysis.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE418

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit

    EE418 Environmental Engineering

    This course introduces students to the study and practice of environmental engineering. Using activities, design projects, and laboratory modules students learn first-hand how engineers use mathematics and science to solve problems in the context of societal needs and desires. Topics include the engineering design process, engineering math, hydrology and water resources, stormwater modeling and management, drinking and wastewater treatment, surface and groundwater transport, transport of air pollutants, environmental regulation, health effects of environmental pollutants, and mitigation and remediation strategies.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Students are accepted by application.

    EE442 Research in Engineering and Computer Science I

    Research in Engineering and Computer Science I is an advanced course for second trimester junior students with the motivation, independence, and maturity necessary to conduct their own research or design projects in engineering or computer science. Students learn research methodology, experimental design, and the engineering design process before conducting a small scale experiment and design project. Students then write a literature review as well as their own research proposal or design specification for a problem of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary engineering literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in engineering research. Students with a final grade of B or higher are encouraged to continue in EE444 Research in Engineering and Computer Science II.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      EE444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in EE442 Research in Engineering I and permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science
    Related Links: EE442

    EE444 Research in Engineering and Computer Science II

    In Research in Engineering and Computer Science II, students continue to gather and analyze experimental data or complete their design project based on their previous trimester work. Time is devoted to the completion of the research or design project and a written paper. Students are encouraged to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium, the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition, and other state and national competitions.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      EE452

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA412 AP Calculus AB (II) and final grade of B or higher in EE402 Electrical Engineering, or permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Related Links: EE402, MA412

    EE452 Biomedical Instrumentation

    In this course students learn the basic principles of electronic instrumentation with biomedical examples. Concepts of analog signal processing, filters, and input and output impedances are emphasized. Students are exposed to system design concepts such as amplifier design and various transducers. Laboratories reinforce basic concepts and offer the student design opportunities in groups. Course includes a final design project.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EE454

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA412 AP Calculus AB (Advanced Topics II) and PH401a Physics with Advanced Topics or PH404 AP Physics C: Mechanics (I), or permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Related Links: EP2, PH4401a, PH402, PH404, MA412

    EE454 Statics

    In this course students learn how to apply the principles of Mechanics to problems of equilibrium. Topics include: vectors, moments, analysis of force systems (trusses, frames, and machines), rigid body equilibrium, center of gravity, and moment of inertia.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      EE456

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Engineering and Computer Science
    Subject: Engineering
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA412 AP Calculus AB (II) and final grade of B or higher in EE402 Electrical Engineering, or permission of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.
    Related Links: EE402

    EE456 Circuits

    In this course, students continue the study of electrical circuits, including DC circuit analysis and theorems, op-amps, first and second order circuits, transient analysis, AC sinusoids and phasors, sinusoidal steady-rate analysis, AC power analysis, three-phase circuits, magnetically coupled circuits, frequency response, and Laplace and Fourier transforms. Laboratories reinforce basic concepts and offer student design opportunities.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    EN354 Fiction Writing

    This course is designed to serve as a workshop for aspiring fiction writers. As a workshop, class sessions are run on a collaborative basis, with all students participating in critiques and general discussions. The objective of the course is to develop the student's sense of the possibilities of narrative fiction, including such components as character, plot, setting, tone, voice, and point of view. Students also learn to use critical terms and approaches appropriate to the task of writing imaginative prose. In addition, we read the work of well-known short fiction writers concurrently with our other class work. These readings are illustrative of principles of craft, theme, and subject and give students a broad base for surveying and understanding the field of short story writing. Final evaluation is based chiefly on a portfolio that each student develops from class assignments and approved outside work. Individual attention is given in regular student-teacher conferences to the development of the portfolio.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN356

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    EN356 Film Studies

    Filmmaker Orson Welles once said, “A film is a ribbon of dreams. The camera is much more than a recording apparatus; it is a medium via which messages reach us from another world that is not ours and that brings us to the heart of a great secret. Here magic begins.” In a culture that increasingly relies on visual information, a comprehension of how meaning grows out of the moving image is essential. This course is a historical and critical survey of the American motion picture both as a developing art form and as a medium of mass communication. The course entails systematic analysis of how filmmakers use sound and image to tell stories on the screen. We view selected films as case studies to understand the relationship between theory and practice in filmmaking. Through explorations of the historical, social, and political dimensions of filmmaking, students learn to read and write more effectively, to look at the world with a critical eye, and most importantly, to develop a critical audio-visual literacy. Students demonstrate what they have learned through independent projects and writing assignments.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      EN362

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    EN362 Classical Myth: Epic and Tragedy

    The creation of the world. The rise of Zeus. The birth of Athena. The abduction of Persephone. The fall of Troy. The wanderings and homecoming of Odysseus. For nearly three thousand years, these stories of gods and mortals have gripped the imaginations of Western listeners and readers. In this course, we explore major myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, with a special emphasis on how these oral tales were committed to writing in epic poems and tragic plays. Throughout the course, we seek to understand these myths in the geographical, historical, and cultural contexts in which they were created. We read ancient Greek and Roman texts in English translation, including works by Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Vergil, and Ovid. Ancient works of art and architecture, including vase paintings and sculpture, form a rich complement to these written sources. We also explore major theories of myth interpretation – from approaches taken by the ancient Greeks themselves to those developed by modern-day theorists – and apply these theories to the myths we encounter. Finally, we explore how later artists, writers, and filmmakers have appropriated, interpreted, and transformed these ancient stories into new forms – often for very different purposes than those served by the myths in the ancient world. Although most of the assessments are essay-based, we also take these ancient myths into our own imaginations in a deep and powerful way and transform them into our own original creations – poems, narratives, dramatic scenes, visual art, and other forms. Our journey together culminates in a public performance of these metamorphoses.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      EN364

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): English II

    EN364 Honors Ecocriticism: Literature and Nature

    Ecocriticism is the study of literature focused through an environmental lens. Students explore a variety of ways to understand literature and how the ideas from those texts better help us define and refine our relationship with nature. Students will consider cross-cultural matters involving the natural world and how these matters influence our sense of identity. Students in Ecocriticism will read widely, both literary and academic texts, and they will draw upon those selections as well as class discussions and online materials to sharpen their critical reading and thinking abilities.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Mondays 8:00 pm.
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Students should have knowledge of American Literature, experience in writing essays, and background in literary study as well as a B+ or better in English 2.

  •      EN366

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    EN366 Poetry Writing

    “I love this – you will love this.” Jonathan Safran Foer's shorthand definition of art provides a context for this course, an introduction to the composition and understanding of poetry. Topics include the current state of poetry writing and publication, the influence of other art forms on poetry, and the role of poetry as a means of both artistic expression and social communication. Assignments focus on developing the tools necessary for writing in a variety of styles, along with developing the habits to enable the generation of ideas, the creation of an authentic voice, the construction of narrative and image, and the process of revision. Throughout the trimester, students accumulate a group of works written in and out of class for inclusion in a portfolio that is the foundation of students' assessment in the course.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN368

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    EN368 Gram-O-Rama

    Formal teaching of grammar bit the dust in the 1960's. Gram-O-Rama is a language laboratory, a verbal arts studio where we attempt to replace the cool mechanics of tradition with the sizzle of experiment. Students interested in wordplay, word power, linguistic acrobatics, the elasticity of syntax, and the profundity of the absurd and incongruous write and perform pieces that explore the music of language and the collusion of sense and nonsense. This is a class that aims to turn the serious study of grammar into performance art. The course culminates in a public performance of selected sketches and skits students have written during the course of the trimester.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN390

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    EN390 Research Experience in the Humanities

    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the rigorous pleasures of research in the humanities. Through work in and out of class, including visits by guest lecturers and trips to local archives and museums, students learn the basic skills of research, including the identification of a compelling intellectual interest and the transformation of that interest into a question that at once requires and excites research of the highest quality. Students then answer this question, in a provisional way, by work that leads first to the statement of a thesis (the answer to the question), then to the initial development of that statement in a shorter paper of ten to twelve pages. Successful completion of the course may also lead to summer research, internships, or apprenticeships with local scholars. Following this course, optional enrollment in EN490 Research in the Humanities I offers selected students the opportunity for more substantial work in their chosen fields of scholarship.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN400

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN400 East-West Studies I: Intellectual Frameworks and Ethical Foundations

    This course explores intersections of East Asian and Western civilizations while simultaneously comparing and contrasting their unique cultural trajectories. We seek to compare and contrast the historical experiences, cultural values and products of civilizations inhabiting opposite extremes of the Eurasian landmass. Given the existence of numerous stereotypes that emphasize divergence, we aim to explore patterns of both similarity and difference. Readings may include excerpts from Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War, Sima Qian's Records of the Historian, Sun Tzu's Art of War, Confucius' Analects, Laozi's Dao de Jing, memorials by Han Feizi and Li Si, the Bible, Buddhist sutras, Homer's Iliad, Luo Guanzhong's Three Kingdoms, St. Augustine's City of God, collected writings of the Church fathers, Castiglione's Book of the Courtier, Sei Shonagon's Pillow Book, and Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji. Secondary texts and film clips will also be used to interpret these ancient and classical works. Students reflect on the intellectual frameworks and ethical foundations of East Asia and the West and analyze the evolution and manifestations of these ideas and values in cultural products, institutions, rituals, and ceremonies. In pursuit of these goals, students write at least one academic essay and undertake multiple group projects. These collective experiences encourage students to imagine history into being through manipulation, integration, and creation of products representative of the various intersections and divergences encountered on our journey across Eurasia.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN402 British Literature and Culture to 1603

    In this course we examine the Latin Christian, Anglo-Saxon, and Anglo-Norman origins of the Anglo-American literary tradition and the richness of the English Renaissance. We encounter early poems like “The Wanderer” and “The Seafarer,” which blend Christian and pagan elements, but which seem strangely modern at times , as well as the story of Beowulf – one of the first great epics in the vernacular literature of the Middle Ages. In the fourteenth century, we see the flowering of a uniquely English national literature in narrative poems like Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, where we join a medieval knight on his quest for a mysterious green man, and in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales we go on an epic pilgrimage – one that has both spiritual and spatial dimensions – in the company of a group of pilgrims who are not only on their way to Canterbury, but to their eternal destinations, as well. The end of the course deals with what Stephen Greenblatt has called “Renaissance self-fashioning” – the emerging idea that human beings are, to quote one Italian Renaissance humanist, the “makers and molders of themselves.” This bold, new claim to human dignity and freedom is revisited in Elizabethan and early Jacobean plays, with their transgressive heroes – Christopher Marlowe's Dr. Faustus and Shakespeare's Hamlet and Macbeth come to mind. These plays rewrite the concept of heroism amid an expanding economy of imagination and the expanding geography of the Atlantic world in an age of explorations, discoveries, and encounters. Classes include interactive background lectures and are discussion-based. Grades are based on a series of essays that invite students to explore the material from comparative and contextual points of view.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN404 British Literature and Culture, 1603 – 1837: From Shakespeare to Frankenstein

    This course includes Britain's rise as a modern, maritime, commercial empire, and spans the period from the reign of James I, when England was still a “green and pleasant land,” to the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837, when urban blight was everywhere in evidence. We begin with the period of Shakespeare's greatest dramas as the King's playwright in a time of relative peace and plenty, but encounter a very different sensibility in the poetry of the English Civil War. We trace the rise of the novel – one of the major achievements of English literary history; the democratization of the arts in the Romantic movement that began in the 1790's; and the triumph of the novel as a vehicle for the dissemination of cultural values in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and a rejection of Enlightenment rationalism in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. This course also features the last and one of the greatest epics – Milton's Paradise Lost – which also features Milton's Satan, a character who recalls Christopher Marlowe's Dr. Faustus, and who inspired both William Blake and Mary Shelley. Classes include interactive background lectures and are discussion-based. Grades are based on a series of essays that invite students to explore the material from comparative and contextual points of view.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN406 British Literature and Culture since 1837: From Wuthering Heights to High Modernism and Beyond

    This course explores British literature in the Age of Empire – and in the wake of the Empire's decline and dismemberment. Readings include works by Victorian poets, including Tennyson and Arnold, as well as Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla, and other works that allow us to think about changing perceptions of the self, women, relationships, sexuality, the social world, and the world of Nature. Literary Modernism and the relationship between the visual arts and literature are central features of the course, and readings include works by T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, and others. We also read Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, with its nostalgic look at the world and the way of life that was lost in two world wars. The course ends with modern poets such as Ted Hughes, Philip Larkin, and post-colonial voices like those of Derek Walcott, whose Omeros has become a modern classic. Classes include interactive background lectures and are discussion-based. Grades are based on a series of essays that invite students to explore the material from comparative and contextual points of view.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN408 East-West Studies II: Ideational and Material Conflicts

    This course explores intersections of East Asian and Western civilizations while simultaneously comparing and contrasting their unique cultural trajectories. We seek to compare and contrast the historical experiences, cultural values and products of civilizations inhabiting opposite extremes of the Eurasian landmass. Given the existence of numerous stereotypes that emphasize divergence, we aim to explore patterns of both similarity and difference. Readings may include excerpts from Arthurian legend, the Tale of the Heike, Yamamoto Tsunetomo's Hagakure, accounts of chevaliers Marshal and de Charney, Priscus' account of the Huns, the Secret History of the Mongols, Marco Polo's Il Milione, Bartolomé de las Casas, accounts of Zheng He, Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, Hobbes' Leviathan, Zhu Xi, Joseph Needham's Science in Traditional China, Newton's Principia Mathematica, les lettres de Madame de Sévigné, Saint-Simon's Mémoires, selections from Bodin, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Mao, and Conrad's Heart of Darkness. Students identify and examine myriad sources of conflict in ideological, political, and material realms that exist within and among European and East Asian societies. In pursuit of these goals, students write at least one academic essay and undertake multiple group projects. These collective experiences encourage students to imagine history into being through manipulation, integration, and creation of products representative of the various intersections and divergences encountered on our journey across Eurasia.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN412

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN412 Southern Literature and Culture

    This course focuses on Southern literature from the period after the Civil War to the present. Southern writers have produced some of the most important and influential works in our national literature. On our way to understanding what it is that makes a work “Southern” besides a map and a birth certificate, we spend some time in class looking at all aspects of Southern culture and history. From the dance hall to the church fellowship hall, from the tobacco field to the football field, we talk about the traditions and habits that define the people of the American South. Through the work of novelists William Faulkner (The Sound and the Fury) and Walker Percy (The Moviegoer), short story writers Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, and George Singleton, along with such key poets as Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, James Dickey, Everette Maddox, Ellen Bryant Voigt, and Frank Stanford, we discuss the role of place, race, politics, history, and myth in the making of a recognizable and ongoing literary tradition.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN414

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN414 Modern World Fiction: Narrating the Self

    Beginning with experimental novels of the late nineteenth-century and focusing on French, Spanish, German, Czech, English, American, Cuban, Colombian, African, and Japanese writers, this comparative literature course examines the extraordinary flowering of twentieth-century fiction – with its open-ended form and experimental styles – against a backdrop of what Stephen Kern has called a transformed “culture of time and space.” In our effort to understand this rich body of literature, we explore the relationships between movements in philosophy and the visual arts – including photography and film – and the changing shapes of fiction. Readings may include short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Michel Tournier; novels such as Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Osamu Dazai's No Longer Human, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Miguel de Unamuno's San Manuel Bueno, Mártir, Kafka's Metamorphosis, Gide's The Immoralist, Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Donna Tartt's Secret History. Through a series of analytical essays, students explore questions about authors and their audiences and the relationship between literary texts and contexts. In the process, students strengthen their own voices and explore the connections between literary and cultural identity.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN416

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN416 Asia I: Ethical Structures and Frameworks of Power

    This interdisciplinary course explores the ancient civilizations and foundational ethical structures of East Asia. Drawing from the fields of archaeology, history, literature, and mythology, students trace the development of early China, Japan, and Korea. Students examine texts from early religious and philosophical traditions, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto. Texts may include early Buddhist sutras, Confucius' Analects and other classics, Laozi's Dao de Jing, T'ang poetry, Lady Shonagon's Pillow Book, and Lady Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji. The class consists of a creative mix of lectures, discussions, and verbal and written analyses of moving and still images. Students also write a major academic essay on an interdisciplinary topic that is guided and assessed in light of the departmental rubric.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN418

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN418 Asia II: Dynastic Change amid Le Peril Blanc

    This interdisciplinary course draws from the fields of archaeology, history, literature, mythology, theater, and music to trace developments within China, Japan, and Korea. We begin with the Mongol conquests of the thirteenth century and end with social and political restructuring during the nineteenth century. Building on the religions and philosophies studied in Asia I, we explore manifestations and adaptations of these ethical foundations in traditional East Asian cultural expressions. A second major topic of Asia II examines the different experiences of East Asian societies as they confront internal challenges and Western colonizers. Primary texts may include Journey to the West, Dream of the Red Chamber, Outlaws of the Marsh, Luo Guanzhong's Romance of the Three Kingdoms, the Tale of the Heike, Zen parables, Kenko's Essays in Idleness, the Hagakure by Yamamoto Tsunetomo, and Basho's poetry. The class consists of a creative mix of lectures, discussions, and verbal and written analysis of moving and still images. We cultivate opportunities for students to experience East Asian arts, potentially including a tea gathering, calligraphy, haiku, painting, gardening, architecture and other forms of artistic expression. Students also write a major academic essay on an interdisciplinary topic that is guided and assessed in light of the departmental rubric.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN420

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN420 Asia III: Virtual Asians and the Occidental Gaze

    This interdisciplinary course presents a radically changed and dynamic landscape. We start with the upheavals of the early twentieth century, including the world wars and revolutionary restructuring of East Asian politics and societies. We explore the significance of modernism and postmodernism in contemporary Asian cultural expressions with a particular emphasis on the cartoon visions found in manga and anime. Asia III additionally considers the increasing global influence of East Asian cultural products, foreign policy, and political activities during an era of economic growth. Texts may include Kawabata's Snow Country or Tanizaki's Naomi, excerpts from Mishima, manga and anime, writings of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, CCP propaganda posters, Ai Wei Wei's art, the film To Live, and Kim's Lost Names. The class consists of a creative mix of lectures, discussions, and verbal and written analyses of moving and still images. Students also write a major academic essay on an interdisciplinary topic that is guided and assessed in light of the departmental rubric.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN422

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN422 Philosophy and Literature in the Twentieth Century: Strategies for Being

    This course explores twentieth-century philosophy, literature, the visual arts, and the thematic ties that bind them together. After 1848, in both texts and images, painters, literary artists, and philosophers increasingly present the self as inherently unstable, reality as a construction, history as a fiction, and the universe as random and chaotic. We read Kierkegaard, who believed that escape from despair lay in taking a “leap” into an “absolute beginning,” and Nietzsche, who embraced an ecstatic vision of the self as a product of will and desire. Heidegger, Sartre, Althusser, Baudrillard, and Deleuze provide other perspectives on the self. In painting, we trace the retreat from the Real in artists like Picasso and Matisse, and the longing to reveal the extraordinary in the ordinary in Magritte – a desire that is pervasive in the novels of Virginia Woolf. Literary texts include Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Paul Bowles's The Sheltering Sky, Marguerite Duras' Hiroshima Mon Amour, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and Samuel Beckett's Company, along with readings in Sartre, Woolf, Dostoevsky, Thomas Mann, Gertrude Stein, and Donna Tartt. Films include Ingmar Bergman's Kierkegaardian Winter Light and Woody Allen's Dostoevskian Crimes and Misdemeanors. Classes are conducted as seminars, with group discussions, background lectures, and presentations. Grades are based on a series of comparative essays and on class participation.

    Meeting Times:
    Two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN424

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN424 Africa I: Pre-Colonial Africa

    In this course, we reflect on the realities and representations of Africa's pre-colonial past before the advent of European political domination around 1880. We consider how Africans, Europeans, and the African diaspora have attributed meaning to the place called Africa. We examine how power, trade, and production have intersected with human lives on a global stage. We discuss how humans have tried to make sense of their life situations in relation to Africa and how the diverse peoples of the continent have communicated their particular contexts.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN426

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN426 Africa II: Modern Africa

    In this course, we explore Africa's recent events, predicaments, and accomplishments. We learn how late nineteenth-century colonialism, anti-colonial resistance, nationalism, independence, modernization, post-colonialism, and neo-colonialism have affected and shaped modern Africa. One way to try to understand the reality of modern Africa is to see multiple aspects of that reality through the eyes of Africans themselves as well as through the eyes of outside observers. We thus turn to writers, scholars, and filmmakers to gain a critical understanding of Africa's historical and contemporary events and experiences.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN428

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Related Links: AS403, AS405

    EN428 Africa III: Modern North Africa and the Middle East

    This course is an introduction to the cultural, political, social, and economic aspects of modern North Africa and the Middle East, from Napoleon's Egyptian invasion to the present Syrian crisis. Proceeding chronologically and thematically, we explore a wide range of North African and Middle Eastern self-identities and stories. Together, we think about North Africa's and the Middle East's ever-changing relations with sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. We reflect on the specific collective memories that help varied peoples from Algerian Islamic fundamentalists to Ashkenazi Israeli settlers explain who they are, what they are doing, and where they are going.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab

  •      EN430

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403, AS405

    EN430 Latin America I: Encounter, Conquest, and Colonialism

    This interdisciplinary course takes a transatlantic approach to the investigation of the native and colonial cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean, from the pre-Columbian era to the early nineteenth century. We examine indigenous civilizations – including those of the Mayans, Aztecs, and Incas – along with the Renaissance backgrounds of the European conquests and the flowering of a new economy of imagination for both Europeans and natives. We investigate the complex world view that produced innovations in cartography and navigation in Europe, as well as the religious and social motivations of Iberian explorers and how their attitudes differed from their English and French counterparts. We look at the blended culture of the Caribbean and at the nature of slave culture in Brazil and the Caribbean, along with constructions of color and understandings of race that differ markedly from those in North America. Literary works include selections from the Mayan Popol Vuh, the chronicles of European explorers like Christopher Columbus and Bernal Díaz del Castillo, and writings by Catalina de Erauso and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN432

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403, AS405

    EN432 Latin America II: Revolution, Nationhood, and the Search for Identity and Autonomy

    This interdisciplinary course explores both the quest for independence and the world after independence, along with the search for authentic national literatures and national and international identities, among Latin American and Latino peoples from the early nineteenth century through the early twenty-first century. As a part of this effort, we focus extensively on United States-Latin American relations. Finally, we explore a variety of works by major Latin American historical and literary figures including Juana Manuela Gorriti, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, José Martí, Rubén Darío, Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Gabriel GarcÍa Marquez, and Isabel Allende.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN436

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN436 Western European Cultural Studies I: Classical and Late Antiquity: Greeks, Romans, and the Genesis of the Mediterranean World

    This class focuses on the weaving of the grand tapestry of the Western tradition with a focus on the history, political life, literature, architecture, and art of Classical Greece and Rome. We also venture into the world of Late Antiquity, which serves as the gateway to the Middle Ages. We begin with a quest for origins – with Ice Age art and the first portrait of a woman, which is 40,000 years old –, but we focus on elements of Western culture that originate in Ancient Greece. These include the concept of participatory government and unique concepts of individual excellence; new ideas about the gods and nature; and new modes of expression in the visual arts, architecture, systematic philosophy, and literature that celebrate humans and the life they live together in the communities they have engineered. We read plays by Euripides, Plato's philosophic meditations on the nature of love and the ideal society, Aristotle's analysis of political communities and the world of nature, and Thucydides' first attempts to write objective history. We look at the cityscapes envisioned by Alexander the Great and see how they became the model for Augustan Rome. We read epic and pastoral poetry by Virgil as well as the first autobiography, which was written by St. Augustine in the fourth century. We ask questions about the uniqueness of Western man's continuing fascination with the life of the mind and reason, and we think about why the idea of the individual develops as it does in the West. We explore the development of the art of writing history and ways of thinking about history, literature, and society that extend from Classical Antiquity to the present, and we make connections between long-vanished worlds and our time. Throughout the trimester, students write a number of evidence-based commentaries and essays. In WECS, we use the essay as a tool of thought as we write our way to knowledge.

    Meeting Times:
    Two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN438

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN438 Western European Cultural Studies II: Medieval and Modern Worlds from St. Augustine to Shakespeare

    This course begins with the origins of medieval Christendom as a unifying force in the fragmented political order that arose in the wake of Rome's decline in the West. It continues with medieval histories, literatures, and the development of the first nation states. We trace the gradual recovery of cultural and commercial ties with the Eastern Mediterranean. We witness the recovery of Aristotle's works from the work of Arab scribes and the incorporation of classical texts in an evolving literary tradition that blends Classical and Christian elements. We explore the twelfth-century Renaissance and the rise of universities, and we encounter philosophic debates over the nature and sources of knowledge. We examine the development of national languages and literatures in France, England, and Italy. We read life-writing by medieval Anchoresses who, by choice, spent their lives in walled enclosures. We read The Song of Roland; Dante's Inferno and Purgatorio; accounts of medieval Crusaders and medieval heretics; letters by Petrarch; political treatises by Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli, and Thomas Hobbes; documents containing the origins and development of Anglo-American traditions in government and law; and plays by Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe. At the end of the course, we encounter the new phenomenon of self-fashioning in characters like Dr. Faustus, who barters his soul for knowledge, and in Hamlet and Macbeth, who find themselves imprisoned in the private spaces of their minds and their aims. We end the trimester with readings from Galileo and Hobbes, who point the way toward a demystified, subjectively constituted world. Throughout the trimester, students write a number of evidence-based commentaries and essays. In WECS, we use the essay as a tool of thought as we write our way to knowledge.

    Meeting Times:
    Two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN440

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN440 Western European Cultural Studies III:  Fashioning Selves and Societies in the Modern World

    This course explores the emergence of the modern world, the modern self, and the modern state, along with revolutions in politics, literature, philosophy, and the visual arts. Topics include the emergence of secular philosophy in Descartes, Hobbes, and Locke; the origins of modern theories of the social contract in Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau; and Romanticism, with its emphasis on the world of feeling. We encounter the alienating world of industrial culture, and new theories about nature and history in Marx and Darwin. We examine Modernism in all its forms – in psychology, in narrative, in the visual arts, in social planning, and in cinema. We also examine the impact of world wars, globalism, the newest versions of cultural imperialism, and the modern world's obsessions with self and self-revelation. Readings include Rousseau, the English Romantics, Darwin, Marx, Kierkegaard, Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Virginia Woolf, and Joseph Conrad, as well as contemporary writers. Throughout the trimester, students write a number of evidence-based commentaries and essays. In WECS, we use the essay as a tool of thought as we write our way to knowledge.

    Meeting Times:
    Two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN442 Western Civilizations:  Wisdom, Revelation, Reason & Doubt I (The Ancient World to the Early Middle Ages)

    This interdisciplinary course explores Western societies from the ancient world to the Early Middle Ages. Through examining texts and cultural artifacts, students discuss the history, literature, philosophy, art, and cultures of the ancient Mesopotamians, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, early Christians, and Europeans of the Middle Ages. Readings include The Epic of Gilgamesh, the Old and New Testaments, Beowulf, and works by Homer, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Virgil, and St. Augustine. Guiding questions for the course include: How have people organized their societies and why? How has religion shaped their lives? How do they define the individual? What are their ethical and moral systems? What is the role of the arts in each culture? What is the relationship between the public and the private spheres? How have people defined themselves in relationship to nature? What are the lasting influences of these societies on the modern world? The course develops students' skills in writing, critical thinking, research, and public speaking.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN444 Western Civilizations:  Wisdom, Revelation, Reason & Doubt II (The High Middle Ages to the Enlightenment)

    This interdisciplinary course explores Western societies from the High Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. Through examining texts and cultural artifacts, students discuss the history, literature, philosophy, art, and culture of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment in Europe. Readings include works by Dante, Chaucer, Machiavelli, Luther, Shakespeare, Galileo, Montaigne, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, and Voltaire. Guiding questions for the course include: How have people organized their societies and why? How has religion shaped their lives? How do they define the individual? What are their ethical and moral systems? What is the role of the arts in each culture? What is the relationship between the public and the private spheres? How have people defined themselves in relationship to nature? What are the lasting influences of these societies on the modern world? The course develops students' skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, research, and public speaking.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN446

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit and one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN446 Western Civilizations:  Wisdom, Revelation, Reason & Doubt III (The Modern World)

    This interdisciplinary course explores modern Europe from the late eighteenth century to the present. Through examining history, literature, philosophy, art, and culture, students discuss the French Revolution, Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, Modernism, Communism, Feminism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Existentialism, Post-Modernism, Globalization, and the European Union. Readings include works by Rousseau, Mill, Marx, Jane Austen, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, Virginia Woolf, and Tom Stoppard. Guiding questions for the course include: How have people organized their societies and why? How has religion shaped their lives? How do they define the individual? What are their ethical and moral systems? What is the role of the arts in each culture? What is the relationship between the public and the private spheres? How have people defined themselves in relationship to nature? What are the lasting influences of these events and ideas on the world today? The course develops students' skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, research, and public speaking.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      EN448

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN448 (Topics in Lit) Modern Latin American Literature in Translation (Topic for T1 and T2, 2019-2020)

    This survey course explores Latin American fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries, with excursions into memoir, essay, and poetry. Writers of the Latin American “Boom” of the 1960s and 70s such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Julio Cortazar will be studied alongside authors such as Uruguayan short story writer Horacio Quiroga, Argentinian purveyor of enigmatic fictions Jorge Luis Borges, and protean Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector, whose short fiction and novels are at the moment finding a large audience in North America. In Latin America, literature and politics are hardly strangers; we will particularly examine the influence and representations of one political event – the Chilean coup d’etat in 1973, which was experienced firsthand by Ariel Dorfman and Roberto Bolaño, writers whose accounts of the event we will compare. Students will read, research, and write about contemporary authors such as Valeria Luiselli and César Aira, and we will debate the usefulness of terms associated with Modern Latin American literature (e.g. “magical realism”). Much of the literature we read in this class is highly original and experimental, sometimes wildly so. Developing the skills and confidence required to read, think about, discuss, and make sense of complex and rich texts are central concerns of this class.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN450

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN450 (Topics in Lit) Literature of the American West (Topic for T2, 2019-2020)

    This course seeks to create a genealogy of the American West through the historical study of selected nineteenth-century American literary and visual texts. The selection is at once the problem and the occasion of our study, for even as these narratives and images give us the landscape, plots, and characters of a familiar “west,” so they occlude a more comprehensive and diverse historical, cultural, and social terrain. In this course, we shall be as interested in the latter as in the former, seeking both to understand the construction of an American West and to discover territories of difference in the counter-narratives of places and peoples otherwise relegated to the margins of national myth. Our texts include novels, popular fiction such as storybook publications and dime novels, short stories, paintings, photography, histories, treaties, and political and legal writing.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN452

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN452 Topics in Literature III

    This comparative literature course focuses on a selected period, genre, movement, author, or literary theme. Students examine authors and audiences, texts and contexts, and their intellectual milieu. Through writing a series of commentaries and academic essays, students claim intellectual ownership of what they have learned. The focus, whenever the course is offered, varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      EN454

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403, AS405

    EN454 Topics in Literature IV

    This comparative literature course focuses on a selected period, genre, movement, author, or literary theme. Students examine authors and audiences, texts and contexts, and their intellectual milieu. Through writing a series of commentaries and academic essays, students claim intellectual ownership of what they have learned. The focus, whenever the course is offered, varies and is announced when course offerings are published.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      EN460

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core English credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN460 STEM and the Stage

    If “it's the wanting to know that makes us matter,” as Tom Stoppard suggests in Arcadia, then it's little wonder that the endeavors of STEM fields to understand the mysteries of our universe have proven such fertile ground for dramatists. In this page-to-stage course, we examine how theatrical art wrestles with the implications and repercussions of STEM discoveries to explore larger questions of our humanity, purpose, and meaning. In addition to plays that include Life of Galileo, Copenhagen, and Arcadia, we consider a range of historical, literary, and scholarly texts that inform and contextualize these works. Through close reading, we strengthen our communication skills by analyzing and critiquing the way an author orients a lay audience to complex STEM concepts and connects them to larger thematic ideas. In a broader sense, our chief concern is to investigate how the efforts of science, mathematics, and the humanities to explain our world intersect, inform, and challenge one another—how in mapping the stars, we might also map our hearts and minds. Creative, stage-related projects and formal academic writing assignments provide substantial opportunities for students to experiment with their own ideas and demonstrate their learning throughout the course.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      EN462

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core English credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three trimesters of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies or completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405 and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: AS403c, AS405c

    EN462 Shakespeare Now

    Few playwrights' body of work persists in production as dependably as that of William Shakespeare, the Elizabethan bard who, as his contemporary Ben Jonson eulogized, “was not of an age, but for all time.” Yet today these plays are as likely to elude as illuminate—at times accomplishing both in the same breath. We'll turn many a page and roll film as we seek to more deeply understand these texts not only in their historical contexts but in light of modern adaptation and staging concerns for film and theater. Class discussion and substantial writing opportunities seek to bridge close analytical readings and broader contextual understandings of these plays in period, at present, and points between. Creative projects and presentations offer students the chance to learn in process and “suffer the slings and arrows” of rendering these works to engage an audience. As we hold the proverbial “mirror up to nature,” what will these plays say to us now, and perhaps more importantly, what will that say about who we are?

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      EN490

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core English credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of AS403 Writing and American Studies or AS405 American Studies, completion of EN390 Research Experience in the Humanities and/or Summer Research Program in the Humanities, and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: EN390

    EN490 Research in the Humanities I

    Research in the Humanities I is an opportunity for students who wish rigorously to pursue scholarly investigation of their own design. This single-term course is available to those who have successfully completed EN390 Research Experience in the Humanities or the Summer Research Program in the Humanities and who have been approved by the Dean of Humanities. The research is critical and interdisciplinary in nature, resulting in the creation of new knowledge. Students present their research at NCSSM's annual Research Symposium and may also present at the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, the MIT Inspire Research Competition, and other research competitions. In addition, students may submit their research for publication in Fifth World, NCSSM's journal of interdisciplinary research in the humanities, and may explore other opportunities for publication.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening classes.

  •      EN492

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: English
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit. NOT core English Credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of EN490 Research in the Humanities I and permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: EN490

    EN492 Research in the Humanities II

    This course does NOT fulfill a core senior English requirement. In this course, students who have taken Research in Humanities I transform their researches into scholarly articles for publication in Fifth World, NCSSM's journal of interdisciplinary research in the humanities, and for submission to other journals and research competitions, such as MIT Inspire. Students also serve as editorial board members of Fifth World, reviewing and evaluating submissions, accepting or rejecting submissions, offering suggestions for revisions, completing the layout and design of the journal, and ensuring the timely delivery of the completed journal to the publisher. This experience will include writing abstracts, preparing reports, and creating presentation posters.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening classes.

  •      FR305

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    FR305 Introductory French

    This first-year course emphasizes the acquisition of basic language skills: speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing. Students acquire a base vocabulary and learn the simple grammatical constructions needed for essential communication. Students also explore the varied cultures of French-speaking peoples throughout the world. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      FR307

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): FR305 Introductory French or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: FR305c

    FR307 Intermediate French

    In this accelerated second-year course students continue to develop their proficiency in French and explore francophone cultures in the world. While emphasis on basic language skills and grammatical construction is continued, students learn to speak and write about self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the past, conditional, and future tenses. Reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations further increase students' proficiency in the language. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      FR354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): FR307 Intermediate French or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: FR307c

    FR354 Advanced French I

    FR354/FR356/FR358 Advanced French is a three-trimester sequence of courses that constitutes a third-year level of French study emphasizing the importance of French as a language of the arts, literature, and philosophy. The courses are conducted entirely in French and students are encouraged to use French in all their classroom interactions. Students build on their proficiencies developed at the intermediate level by learning more advanced grammatical concepts and skills. Students read extensively in excerpts from literary and journalistic texts and write short compositions about those texts. Students read and study in detail Antoine de Saint-Exupery's novel, Le Petit Prince, or another major text. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      FR356

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): FR354 Advanced French I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: FR354

    FR356 Advanced French II

    FR354/FR356/FR358 Advanced French is a three-trimester sequence of courses that constitutes a third-year level of French study emphasizing the importance of French as a language of the arts, literature, and philosophy. The courses are conducted entirely in French and students are encouraged to use French in all their classroom interactions. Students build on their proficiencies developed at the intermediate level by learning more advanced grammatical concepts and skills. Students read extensively in excerpts from literary and journalistic texts and write short compositions about those texts. Students read and study in detail Antoine de Saint-Exupery's novel, Le Petit Prince, or another major text. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      FR358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): FR356 Advanced French II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: FR356

    FR358 Advanced French III

    FR354/FR356/FR358 Advanced French is a three-trimester sequence of courses that constitutes a third-year level of French study emphasizing the importance of French as a language of the arts, literature, and philosophy. The courses are conducted entirely in French and students are encouraged to use French in all their classroom interactions. Students build on their proficiencies developed at the intermediate level by learning more advanced grammatical concepts and skills. Students read extensively in excerpts from literary and journalistic texts and write short compositions about those texts. Students read and study in detail Antoine de Saint-Exupery's novel, Le Petit Prince, or another major text. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      FR404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): FR358 Advanced French III or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities
    Related Links: FR358

    FR404 Modern French Readings and Media I

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art—as we will discover in this three-trimester course sequence that constitutes a fourth-year study of French and is suitable for students who have demonstrated advanced proficiency in the language. In these courses, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests. Each trimester, students visit a local museum, theater production, or film, depending on available exhibitions and shows. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      FR406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): FR404 Modern French Readings/Media I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.

    FR406 Modern French Readings and Media II

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art—as we will discover in this three-trimester course sequence that constitutes a fourth-year study of French and is suitable for students who have demonstrated advanced proficiency in the language. In these courses, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests. Each trimester, students visit a local museum, theater production, or film, depending on available exhibitions and shows. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      FR408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): FR406 Modern French Readings/Media II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: FR406

    FR408 Modern French Readings and Media III

    Another important aspect of French is its major influence on modernist and post-modernist thought, literature, and art—as we will discover in this three-trimester course sequence that constitutes a fourth-year study of French and is suitable for students who have demonstrated advanced proficiency in the language. In these courses, students read, analyze, and discuss in French short stories, plays, poetry, and essays in conjunction with study of the fine arts, film, TV, and advertising to gain a deeper understanding of modern French and francophone cultures. Through the study of different media, students examine popular currents such as symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism that have shaped modern thought and philosophy. Independent projects allow students to pursue personal interests. Each trimester, students visit a local museum, theater production, or film, depending on available exhibitions and shows. Previously-studied grammatical structures are reviewed, and more advanced grammar is introduced organically as it appears in the readings. Students sharpen all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      HU350

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.

    HU350 Twentieth-Century Music History

    This course is a chronological survey of twentieth-century music, focusing primarily on the late Romantic era, Impressionism, Expressionism, Nationalism, Serialism, and twentieth-century American music. Students use music and listening as a vehicle to understanding theoretical and historical trends of each stylistic period. Overviews of the composers and their musical styles serve as a conceptual focus for the music that students examine in each historical period. A key component of the course is regular listening labs in which students sharpen their powers of listening and concentration and apply concepts and theories they have learned in the course to their analyses of selected musical compositions and performances.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      HU354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.

    HU354 Black Studies

    Black Studies implements an interdisciplinary format to examine the cultural, political, and economic development of Black America. The course begins with the African Diaspora and culminates with the rise of Hip Hop culture. On one hand, the course examines a long history of white supremacy in Anglo-American thought and action that exploited black labor and delegitimized black lives. On the other hand, the course interrogates Black America's persistent fight for full citizenship and cultural autonomy – a domestic crusade that draws strength and meaning from anti-colonial struggles abroad. Students will continually ask: What defines whiteness and blackness? What functions do racial classifications serve? Overall, students locate the origins and development of the conflicts and commonalities at the heart of the Black American experience.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or one period per week including lab and an additional asynchronous online component.

  •      HU356

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.

    HU356 History of Western Music

    This course is a chronological survey of twentieth-century music, focusing primarily on the late Romantic era, Impressionism, Expressionism, Nationalism, Serialism, and twentieth-century American music. Students learn to listen to and analyze music critically, as a vehicle to understanding theoretical and historical trends of each stylistic period. Overviews of the composers and their musical styles serve as a conceptual focus for the music that students examine in each historical period. A key component of the course is regular listening labs in which students sharpen their powers of listening and concentration and apply concepts and theories they have learned in the course to their analyses of selected musical compositions and performances.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      HU358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.

    HU358 Race, Leadership, and Ethics

    Students study profiles of leadership in relationship to issues of racial justice and equality. They acquire an in-depth knowledge of ethics and apply that knowledge to historical and contemporary issues involving racial identity and racial justice in the American cultural landscape. Topics addressed in the course include tools for ethical decision-making, race and education, the criminal justice system and the death penalty, race-based medicine, eugenics, racial profiling, racial privilege, and appreciation vs. appropriation of culture. Course materials and activities include readings, discussions, tests and essays, films, and guest speakers.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      HU358

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): None

    HU358 Honors Race, Leadership, and Ethics

    Students will study profiles of leadership in relationship to issues of race and ethics. Additionally, students will understand the ways that race influences ethical decision-making. They will acquire an in-depth knowledge of ethics and apply that knowledge to historical and contemporary issues involving racial identity and racial justice in the United States. Topics addressed in the course include tools for ethical decision-making, moral theories and ethical frameworks, race and education, the criminal justice system, cultural appropriation, race-based medicine, eugenics, racial profiling, and racial privilege. Course materials and activities include readings, discussions, videos, essays, and tests.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Wednesdays 7:00 pm.
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      HU362

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of two trimesters of AS403 or AS405.
    Related Links: AS405b, AS403b

    HU362 Topics in Contemporary America

    This interdisciplinary course allows students to continue their exploration of the multiple strands of American culture begun in the junior year American Studies course. With time for deeper examination of contemporary American life, the course familiarizes students with the context of continuing political, social, and cultural issues and with the arcs of recent change relevant to their own lifetimes. By studying selected primary and secondary sources from the 1960s to the present day, students construct their own understandings of the multiple identities articulated by modern Americans living in increasingly global and virtual communities. The course offers students the opportunity to explore topics of consequence to them, including explorations of the effects of 9/11, the rise of the LGBTQ movement, and the changes wrought on American culture by the internet and mobile computing. Students cultivate skills of analysis that help them to think and speak with greater clarity, power, and eloquence. Assessments include writing assignments that invite students to synthesize their understanding of the texts, contexts, and cultural artifacts explored in the course.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      HU364

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.

    HU364 Women's Studies

    Gloria Steinem famously said, “A feminist is anyone who recognizes the equality and full humanity of women and men.” In this course, students explore the role American women have played in shaping our understanding of what it means to be human and in demanding that women's full humanity be recognized – in a culture that, even now, at times derides the Women's Movement or accuses it of being irrelevant. By studying the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural forces that have shaped different waves of feminism and feminist theory/literature, and how they continue to do so today, students learn how to think critically about issues of women's leadership, equality, gender, and history. Through a variety of assignments and activities, students continue to develop their skills in reading, critical thinking, writing, presenting, and working collaboratively with their peers. In a service learning component of the course, students create a lesson about significant women in American society and teach the lesson to students at a local elementary school.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      HU366

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.
    Prerequisite(s):
    Related Links: AS405b, AS403b

    HU366 Critical Race Theory

    This course explores the foundations and central tenets of Critical Race Theory, from its origins in Critical Legal Studies, to current applications, debates, and evolutions, with particular attention to CRT’s intersections with the field of American Studies (including “offshoots” such as TribalCrit, LatCrit, AsianCrit, and DisCrit). The class will collectively create a working list of characteristics that we can apply to legal cases, literature, and other mainstream pop-cultural texts such as plays, music (videos), TV shows, and movies. CRT provides a meaningful, practical, and evidence-based lens to engage in cultural productions of citizenship and race as they relate to the U.S. and to emerging concepts of global citizenship. One of the most important aspects of engaged citizenship is to formulate an understanding of the diverse experiences of U.S. citizens; this course allows students to explore those diverse experiences and different understandings of belonging through legal studies and storytelling/narratives. By the end of the course, students will produce scholarship that addresses their expanded knowledge base by applying the framework to a cultural text outside the required course texts.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab, or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      HU390

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Humanities Electives
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.

    HU390 Research Experience in the Fine Arts

    Research informs action; action brings about change. The synthesis, production, and dissemination of new knowledge can have broad implications for every area of human endeavor, and art provides an entryway to new understandings of that human endeavor for both artist and audience. In this course, we explore and apply the research process in the creation of fine art. Through careful study of a selected genre or discipline and rigorous interrogation of a subject or set of subjects, we explore the intersections between fact and invention, the difficulty of separating the objective from the subjective, and the ethical implications of using research to inform the creation of art. The culmination of the course is student-created works of art informed by the research process. The area of the fine arts on which the course focuses varies year to year and encompass the range of the fine arts – from creative writing to the visual arts, music, and drama. The focus is announced with the published course offerings each year.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      IE304

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1

    IE304 Ignite to Engage

    The Ignite To Engage series is for junior students to explore their interests and build professional skills required to participate as a maker, thinker, doer in an experience that requires the application of knowledge and skills to address challenges in the world beyond the classroom. Topics and activities will focus on research and innovation opportunities at NCSSM, but acquired skills could be applied for other opportunities students would identify on their own. Students can complete these opportunities a la carte by registering to individual events within the series, but participation and completion in the full set of series and outcomes will receive a passing credit to recognize their engagement and professional development. Some of these sessions may take place during NCSSM Online weekends.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall semester Zoom sessions, Thursday 9pm

    Requirements:
    Junior Only Course

  •      IE306

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Biology
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): None

    IE306 Honors Forensic Science

    This course is designed to integrate the core scientific disciplines (as outlined in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study for grades 9-12) while giving students both theory and hands-on experience with the skills and knowledge required of a forensic crime scene investigator. This multidisciplinary approach will highlight topics in pathology, DNA, anatomy, chemistry, anthropology, toxicology, entomology, and investigative techniques with supplemental subject matter through case studies, earth science, mathematics, medicine, technology and psychology. In addition, some of the ethical, legal, and social concerns surrounding forensics will be discussed. Process skills will include comparative analysis, critical thinking, deductive reasoning, observation, organization, problem solving, research, communication, and technical reading. Project-based learning through laboratory investigation and discussions/class lecture will serve as the main method of content delivery. Individually and/or in groups, students will perform lab work and apply inference and deductive reasoning to the investigation and potential solving of crimes.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 7:00pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional
    Spring Semester: Wednesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: February 15, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: This course requires the ability to write clear and concise lab and investigative reports. Good writing skills are imperative. This course also deals with graphic content. Parents are asked to sign a permission slip at the beginning of the course, but students are expected to be mature when dealing with this content.

  •      IE308

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite courses required, however, students must apply, be accepted, and fully commit to the Mentorship Program. This course is required for juniors selected to the NCSSM Mentorship program via application reviewed by Director of Mentorship and Research and committee. The successful completion of this course is required to identify a mentor and move into the NCSSM Mentorship experience in the summer for Mentorship 1 students, in fall/winter for Mentorship 2 students, and summer/fall/winter for Mentorship 3 students.

    IE308 Explorations in Mentorship

    Explorations in Mentorship is a required course for NCSSM junior students selected for NCSSM Mentorship Program to prepare to engage in their Mentorship experience with an off-campus mentor in the upcoming summer and/or fall/winter. This course gives students ownership of their Mentorship opportunity by facilitating students’ career development skills including identifying their interests, setting personal goals, finalizing professional communication materials, and understanding common workplace expectations. Students will also investigate their curiosity and interests by identifying, acquiring, reading, citing, and paraphrasing primary research or professional literature or sources. As part of this course, students will begin a portfolio of materials demonstrating their growth and skill development, including a set of readings that relate to their particular area of Mentorship interest, a resume and cover email for mentor requests, and a record their reflection and activities throughout the journey. In addition, students will complete all necessary tasks to identify and secure a mentor for the student’s upcoming research experience and to be in compliance for their off-campus Mentorship experience.

    Meeting Times:
    Online delivered: One period per week. Residentially delivered: Two periods per week. Weekends optional. Some programming may take place on weekends.

  •      IE340

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): None

    IE340 Honors Introduction to Computational Science

    This is an honors level introductory course in the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science. Computational science, not to be confused with “computer science,” looks to answer this question: “How can computers and mathematics be used to study interesting problems in science and social science?” Computational science is sometimes known as “modeling and simulation,” or “scientific computing,” and looks to create and use mathematical models to study complicated and complex problems in all areas of study. Recommended for fall, junior year.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: This is a computer-intensive course; there are no physical (wet) labs. This course uses a significant amount of specialized software, all of which is provided free of charge, either by NCSSM or by the creators of that software. Students must be able to install software on the computers used for these courses, sometimes on short notice! If using a school computer, students must ensure that the school will allow them to install specialized software on a school machine. There are no paper/pencil alternate activities. Students must ensure that a backup machine is available if their primary machine is not available.

  •      IE350

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): None

    IE350 Honors Forensic Anthropology

    Forensic anthropology is an applied area of physical anthropology that employs methods developed in osteology, skeletal biology, bioarchaeology, and paleopathology to the recovery and identification of human remains in medico-legal contexts. This course introduces students to the recovery and interpretation of human skeletal remains within the context of scientific death investigation, emphasizing a multidisciplinary approach to research and interpretation. The primary focus of this course is construction of a biological profile which will include the recognition of human vs. non-human skeletal material, assessment of age, sex, ancestry, stature, and the recognition of trauma and lesions. Throughout the course, students will develop a strong working knowledge of human osteology and bone biology and apply that knowledge through various applied exercises and assessment strategies.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Monday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: This course requires the ability to write clear and concise lab and investigative reports. Good writing skills are imperative.

  •      IE360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    IE360 Digital Humanities

    This course lies at the intersection of the study of the humanities – literature and language, history, economics, psychology, sociology, and the arts – with the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science. Digital Humanities is one of the most rapidly expanding disciplines in humanities research, and students taking this course will be at that cutting edge. Students learn and apply a wide variety of computing methods such as text pattern analyses, network generation and analyses, and image processing and tools such as Mathematica and R to the study of literature, history, art, and other topics in the humanities and the social sciences. By situating our experiences with technology within their historical contexts, we develop an understanding of the changing role of technology in our lives and an understanding how technology affects the ways we think and experience the world. Texts include The Bestseller Code: Anatomy of the Blockbuster Novel, excerpts from The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, and selections by Noam Chomsky, Neil Postman, Leo Marx, and Lewis Mumford. A main feature of the course is the emphasis on practical applications of digital humanities techniques: students complete at least three mini-projects with a culminating final project. Digital Humanities will be team-taught by faculty from both the Humanities Department and the Science Department. No prior programming experience is required.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    This course is cross-listed as CM360 Digital Humanities and IE360 Digital Humanities

  •      IE362

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1

    IE362 Honors Data Science for Scientists

    Data Science is the study of the generalizable extraction of knowledge from data. Being a data scientist requires an integrated skill set spanning mathematics, statistics, machine learning, databases and other branches of computer science along with a good understanding of the craft of problem formulation to engineer effective solutions. This course will introduce students to this rapidly growing field and equip them with some of its basic principles and tools as well as its general mindset. Students will learn concepts, techniques and tools they need to deal with various facets of data science practice, including data collection and integration, exploratory data analysis, predictive modeling, descriptive modeling, data product creation, evaluation, and effective communication. The focus in the treatment of these topics will be on breadth, rather than depth, and emphasis will be placed on integration and synthesis of concepts and their application to solving problems. To make the learning contextual, real datasets from a variety of scientific disciplines will be used.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Some background in computer science is helpful but not required.

  •      IE380

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2

    IE380 Honors Bioinformatics: Computational Biology

    Computational biology – known also as “bioinformatics” – is a hybrid, interdisciplinary course, and is one of the most important new fields of study in science. Computational biology isn't a biology course per se – it's the application of computing and mathematics (primarily statistics) to biological data. What biological data? Mostly genetics and genomics data, such as studies of DNA extracted from mice breeding experiments to predict the genetic basis of diseases such as cancer, high blood pressure, and obesity! Do well in this class, and there will be a multitude of opportunities open as an undergraduate researcher and beyond! Recommended for spring, junior year.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Wednesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: This course uses a significant amount of specialized software, all of which is provided free of charge, either by NCSSM or by the creators of that software. Students must be able to install software on the computers used for these courses, sometimes on short notice! If using a school computer, students must ensure that the school will allow them to install specialized software on a school machine. There are no paper/pencil alternate activities. Students must ensure that a backup machine is available if their primary machine is not available.

  •      IE390

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of one or more computational science courses in the NCSSM Online catalog OR evidence of computational experience/permission of the Dean.

    IE390 Honors Research Experience in Computational Science

    Research Experience courses provide research skills development and the opportunity to complete a research project in the subject areas indicated. There are no prerequisites and these single-semester courses are available to juniors or seniors. Some students, upon completion of the course, may elect to be considered for other research opportunities at NCSSM, although it is not required.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Monday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: This is a computer-intensive course; there are no physical (wet) labs. This course uses a significant amount of specialized software, all of which is provided free of charge, either by NCSSM or by the creators of that software. Students must be able to install software on the computers used for these courses, sometimes on short notice! If using a school computer, students must ensure that the school will allow them to install specialized software on a school machine. There are no paper/pencil alternate activities. Students must ensure that a backup machine is available if their primary machine is not available.

  •      IE402

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): Honors Chemistry

    IE402 Honors Introduction to Industrial Chemistry & Engineering

    This is a semester-long interdisciplinary course that focuses on the industrial practice of chemistry. It provides students with a real-world perspective thereby creating an awareness of the relevance of chemistry to their daily lives. For example, students will learn in a chronologically historical sequence about major developments in industrial chemistry, such as ammonia, aluminum, and nylon that have significantly affected people's lives. Students will engage in individual and group online activities, as well as collaborative lab experiences on campus, such as developing soap or aspirin.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Monday 7:00pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional

  •      IE404

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Research or Professional Experience at NCSSM or through Summer Ventures; or permission of the instructor if student completed an experience with another organization.

    IE404 Engage to Impact

    The Engage To Impact course provides students the opportunity to further develop professional skills to communicate their findings and the impact of an experience where the student has engaged as a maker/thinker/doer to address challenges in the world beyond the classroom. Ultimately in this course, students will present their findings or progress via a paper, poster, and/or oral presentation. This course further builds the technical communication skills to discuss students' findings from a previous research or professional experience accurately and clearly, but also provides time to further investigate appropriate background and context in the literature necessary to present. The course prepares students to present at conferences or events such as NC Science and Engineering Fair, Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, State of North Carolina Undergraduate Creativity and Research Symposium, and similar events.

  •      IE405

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): Requires acceptance to the NCSSM Mentorship 2 or Mentorship 3 program via application reviewed by the Director of Mentorship and Research and committee and successful completion of IE308 Mentorship Explorations with a grade of B or higher and an approved and committed mentor for the Mentorship experience (unless approved by the Director of Mentorship and Research).
    Related Links: IE308

    IE405 Senior Mentorship

    Senior Mentorship is a course required for students in Mentorship 2 and Mentorship 3 Programs. This course gives students ownership of their Mentorship opportunity by facilitating students’ professional and personal skills including reflecting on and achieving personal goals, crafting and delivering an effective message, and successfully engaging in a project as a maker/thinker/doer. Students will continue to investigate their curiosity and interests by making foundational connections between primary research or professional literature or sources and their own project. As part of this course, students will spend two afternoons per week engaging in their Mentorship experience with an off-campus mentor. A necessary part of that experience includes continuing to build their portfolio of materials demonstrating their growth and skill development, including a set of readings that relate to their particular area of Mentorship interest, a grant proposal and a final professional product to communicate their findings, and a record of their reflection and activities throughout the journey. In addition, all students will be required to craft and deliver an oral presentation of their findings to a broad audience at the NCSSM Research Symposium community-wide event in the spring.

    Meeting Times:
    Seven periods per week including two labs.

  •      IE406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: Two units core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Requires acceptance to the Mentorship program and to the course via application reviewed by the Director of Mentorship and Research and successful completion of IE405 Senior Mentorship with a grade of B or higher and written commitment from the student's mentor (unless otherwise approved by the Director of Mentorship and Research).
    Related Links: IE405b

    IE406 Extended Senior Mentorship

    This course is intended for students whose Mentorship experience presents the opportunity for a full additional term of work. Students must apply for the Senior Mentorship Extended course, be accepted, and fully commit to the course. The application includes: written commitment from the mentor to work with the student for a full additional term, description of work already completed by the student, specific goals for the additional term of Mentorship, schedule of days and times student will work with the mentor, and a clear and acceptable plan for transportation which must meet NCSSM regulations and be approved by NCSSM. As part of this course, students will spend two afternoons per week engaging in their Mentorship project with an off-campus mentor. A necessary part of that experience includes continuing to build their portfolio of materials demonstrating their growth and skill development, including expanding their collection of readings related to their particular area of Mentorship interest, a final professional product targeted to experts in the field to communicate their findings (distinct from the product created in Senior Mentorship), and a record of their reflection and activities throughout the journey.

    Meeting Times:
    Meeting Pattern: Seven periods per week including two labs.

    Requirements:
    Students must provide a clear and acceptable plan for transportation which must meet NCSSM regulations and be approved by NCSSM since transportation is not included as part of this course.

  •      IE408

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): None

    IE408 Honors Energy and Sustainability

    This course will introduce students to key topics in the field of global sustainability. Students will explore how human societies can endure in the face of global change, ecosystem degradation and global resource limitations. The course requires multidisciplinary study of topics linked by their importance to sustainability in the sciences (both natural and social), engineering, and economics and will include policy and technical insight into systems and methods used to analyze and understand systems. Students will practice applying analytical skills, often in groups, through case studies, technical and popular science articles, systems thinking models, videos and interactive simulations and an engineering design project.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Required

  •      IE410

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): Math III

    IE410 Honors Introduction to Systems Thinking: Modeling the Environment

    Climate change, pandemics, sustainable supply chains and networks, boom and bust in real estate - these all involve dynamics that challenge our ability to think through the consequences because they are part of complex systems with multiple moving parts. In this course students will learn how to build mathematical models to capture key interrelationships, and to use carefully designed simulations to reveal dynamic patterns. Students will use a variety of computational tools from spreadsheets to modeling software, applied to a broad range of environmental, sustainability and business problems. The course assumes no prior knowledge of these tools. Course materials are designed to step students through the mechanics of systems thinking and explore the consequences - often unexpected but usually very helpful - that system thinking models predict.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional

  •      IE442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Students apply in the Fall for entry in the Winter trimester.

    IE442 Research in Computational Science I

    This is an advanced course for students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn computational methodology and design while conducting a variety of computational projects on a small scale. Students then write their own research proposals on a problem of interest to them. Throughout the trimester, students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in computational science research. Based on the outcomes of the trimester's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus or in the Triangle area. Students with a final grade of B or higher are encouraged to continue in CM444 Research in Computational Science II.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      IE444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in CM442 Research in Computational Science I or successful participation in a summer research program, and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: IE442

    IE444 Research in Computational Science I

    In this course, students continue to conduct computational research based on their previous trimester and/or summer work. Time is devoted to the completion of the research project and a written paper. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and at other state and national competitions.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      IE446

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in CM444 Research in Computational Science II and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: IE444

    IE446 Research in Computational Science III

    In this course, students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and analysis, as needed, or to research extension questions based on their original work. Students in this course have a leadership role in working with the junior students enrolled in CM442 Research in Computational Science I and may serve as teaching assistants.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      IE448

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in CM446 Research in Computational Science III and permission of the Dean of Science.

    IE448 Research in Computational Sci IV

    In this course, students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and analysis, as needed, or to research extension questions based on their original work. Students in this course have a leadership role in working with the junior students enrolled in CM442 Research in Computational Science I and may serve as teaching assistants.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      IE449

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Multi-term Course: 2 terms (a,b)
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    IE449 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    Formerly IE309a and IE309b- students who have previously taken that course are not eligible to take IE449. The special function of the entrepreneur is to innovate. At the core of this introductory course on entrepreneurship is an exploration of what it means to be innovative. Students will experience the search for “innovation opportunities” within a wide range of market spaces. Questions related to value generation, effective collaboration, and leadership will be investigated. The element of risk will be front and center as student-entrepreneurs evaluate the complexities of moving from an idea to a sustainable and (we hope) profitable business model. Throughout the course, student teams will bring the themes and principles of entrepreneurship to life by building a business around an innovative product. As a culminating event, students will showcase their innovations during an entrepreneurial fair on campus. Fundamentally, Introduction to Entrepreneurship is designed to provide students with a platform for creative and innovative thinking.

    Meeting Times:
    One weekly 100-minute evening class meeting.

  •      IE449

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Multi-term Course: 2 terms (a,b)
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Semester1, Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): None

    IE449 Honors Introduction to Entrepreneurship 1

    The special function of the entrepreneur is to innovate. At the core of this introductory course on entrepreneurship is an exploration of what it means to be innovative. Students will experience the search for “innovation opportunities” within a wide range of market spaces. Questions related to value generation, effective collaboration, and leadership will be investigated. The element of risk will be front and center as student-entrepreneurs evaluate the complexities of moving from an idea to a sustainable and (we hope) profitable business model. Throughout the course, student teams will bring the themes and principles of entrepreneurship to life by building a business around an innovative product. As a culminating event, students will showcase their innovations during an entrepreneurial fair on campus. Fundamentally, Introduction to Entrepreneurship is designed to provide students with a platform for creative and innovative thinking.

    Meeting Times:
    Residential Course. Online students participate via Zoom: Weekly webinar Thursdays, 6:15 - 7:55 pm, and required Entrepreneurship Fair in Spring 2020 (Date/time TBD)

  •      IE450

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Interdisciplinary Electives
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Selection by the proposal evaluation committee.

    IE450 Applications in Entrepreneurship

    “Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage” – Victor Kiam. This course provides the necessary background material and a structured opportunity for students with ideas for products or services to bring their ideas from conception to market through this real-life activity of entrepreneurship. A thematic focus for the products or services is announced each year. Students submit their thematically-related ideas to a proposal evaluation committee which reviews the applications and selects the student teams for that year's enrollment. Students then learn and apply the steps involved in marketing their ideas including market analysis, business plan development, and presentation to potential investors. At the conclusion of the term, student team(s) may be invited to continue their work as a Special Study Option for an additional term.

    Meeting Times:
    One 2-hour evening class meeting.

  •      JA305

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    JA305 Introductory Japanese

    Emphasis in this first-year course is placed on the acquisition of basic language skills: speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing. Students acquire a base vocabulary and learn the simple grammatical constructions needed for essential communication. Cultural aspects of Japan are also introduced.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week, plus one evening class meeting.

  •      JA307

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): JA305 Introductory Japanese or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: JA305c

    JA307 Intermediate Japanese

    In this course, students continue their journey into Japanese language and culture. Emphasis on basic language skills and grammatical construction is continued. Students' proficiency in the language is further increased by reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations. Most of the grammatical constructions are learned.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week, plus one evening class meeting.

  •      LA305

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    LA305 Introductory Latin

    Verbs and nouns, as they are conjugated or declined in hundreds of distinct forms, are the central focus of this course. We see how grammatical order enables verbs and nouns to make up sentences, with the help of pronouns, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, and conjunctions. We develop both analytical skill in paying attention to details and synthetical skill in remembering many basic forms together. We recite daily, learn roots of modern works, diagram and translate Latin sentences, and discover aspects of Roman culture.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      LA307

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): LA305 Introductory Latin or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA305c

    LA307 Intermediate Latin

    Julius Caesar’s Commentaries on the Gallic War have schooled second-year Latin students for centuries, and now we join these students. During the first half of our year, as preparation for reading Caesar, we submit to rigorous boot camp in studying adjectives and adverbs in their three degrees, infinitives, indirect statements, participles, ablative absolutes, gerundives, gerunds, deponents, locatives, and irregular verbs. We learn the subjunctive mood as we study Caesar’s use of it in writing about his adventures in Gaul.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      LA404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): LA307 Intermediate Latin or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA307c, LA410, LA412, LA414

    LA404 Advanced Latin Poetry I

    A reward for having studied Latin during two or more rigorous years is the delight of reading Ovid, Catullus, and Horace in the original Latin. Brilliant, witty, and humane Ovid preserved ancient oral tradition in his rhythmic written lines, inspiring Shakespeare and others for centuries. Catullus composed short songs, lyrical in love. As he both hated and loved at the same time, his work is comparable to some songs of today. Horace sacrificed frivolity, dedicating himself to his Sabine farm and returning to the springing waters of inspiration. NOTE: The LA404/406/408 sequence and the LA410/412/414 sequence are offered in alternate years. Neither sequence is prerequisite for the other. Junior students with the requisite ability may take whichever sequence is offered that year. Then, as seniors, students may take the other sequence, rounding out a two-year sequence in advanced Latin.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      LA406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): LA404 Advanced Latin Poetry I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA404, LA410, LA412, LA414

    LA406 Advanced Latin Poetry II

    A reward for having studied Latin during two or more rigorous years is the delight of reading Ovid, Catullus, and Horace in the original Latin. Brilliant, witty, and humane Ovid preserved ancient oral tradition in his rhythmic written lines, inspiring Shakespeare and others for centuries. Catullus composed short songs, lyrical in love. As he both hated and loved at the same time, his work is comparable to some songs of today. Horace sacrificed frivolity, dedicating himself to his Sabine farm and returning to the springing waters of inspiration. NOTE: The LA404/406/408 sequence and the LA410/412/414 sequence are offered in alternate years. Neither sequence is prerequisite for the other. Junior students with the requisite ability may take whichever sequence is offered that year. Then, as seniors, students may take the other sequence, rounding out a two-year sequence in advanced Latin.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      LA408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): LA406 Advanced Latin Poetry II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA406, LA410, LA412, LA414

    LA408 Advanced Latin Poetry III

    A reward for having studied Latin during two or more rigorous years is the delight of reading Ovid, Catullus, and Horace in the original Latin. Brilliant, witty, and humane Ovid preserved ancient oral tradition in his rhythmic written lines, inspiring Shakespeare and others for centuries. Catullus composed short songs, lyrical in love. As he both hated and loved at the same time, his work is comparable to some songs of today. Horace sacrificed frivolity, dedicating himself to his Sabine farm and returning to the springing waters of inspiration. NOTE: The LA404/406/408 sequence and the LA410/412/414 sequence are offered in alternate years. Neither sequence is prerequisite for the other. Junior students with the requisite ability may take whichever sequence is offered that year. Then, as seniors, students may take the other sequence, rounding out a two-year sequence in advanced Latin.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      LA410

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): LA307 Intermediate Latin or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA307c, LA404, LA406, LA408

    LA410 Advanced Latin Prose I

    A reward for having studied Latin during two or more rigorous years is the delight of reading Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero in the original Latin. We are in Britain as Caesar passes below the cliffs of Dover, discovers ocean tides, loses ships in a hurricane, and heartens his cold, stranded Roman soldiers who fight bravely on. Then we are in Rome, hearing Sallust tell how Catiline's conspiracy is threatening the republic. Cicero the consul wears a metal breastplate under his clothing to save his life, and he attacks Catiline with elegant passionate speeches before the Senate. A small, dark, stark prison shows Roman power at its worst. NOTE: The LA404/406/408 sequence and the LA410/412/414 sequence are offered in alternate years. Neither sequence is prerequisite for the other. Junior students with the requisite ability may take whichever sequence is offered that year. Then, as seniors, students may take the other sequence, rounding out a two-year sequence in advanced Latin.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      LA412

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): LA410 Advanced Latin Prose I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA410, LA404, LA406, LA408

    LA412 Advanced Latin Prose II

    A reward for having studied Latin during two or more rigorous years is the delight of reading Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero in the original Latin. We are in Britain as Caesar passes below the cliffs of Dover, discovers ocean tides, loses ships in a hurricane, and heartens his cold, stranded Roman soldiers who fight bravely on. Then we are in Rome, hearing Sallust tell how Catiline's conspiracy is threatening the republic. Cicero the consul wears a metal breastplate under his clothing to save his life, and he attacks Catiline with elegant passionate speeches before the Senate. A small, dark, stark prison shows Roman power at its worst. NOTE: The LA404/406/408 sequence and the LA410/412/414 sequence are offered in alternate years. Neither sequence is prerequisite for the other. Junior students with the requisite ability may take whichever sequence is offered that year. Then, as seniors, students may take the other sequence, rounding out a two-year sequence in advanced Latin.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      LA414

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): LA412 Advanced Latin Prose II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: LA412, LA404, LA406, LA408

    LA414 Advanced Latin Prose III

    A reward for having studied Latin during two or more rigorous years is the delight of reading Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero in the original Latin. We are in Britain as Caesar passes below the cliffs of Dover, discovers ocean tides, loses ships in a hurricane, and heartens his cold, stranded Roman soldiers who fight bravely on. Then we are in Rome, hearing Sallust tell how Catiline's conspiracy is threatening the republic. Cicero the consul wears a metal breastplate under his clothing to save his life, and he attacks Catiline with elegant passionate speeches before the Senate. A small, dark, stark prison shows Roman power at its worst. NOTE: The LA404/406/408 sequence and the LA410/412/414 sequence are offered in alternate years. Neither sequence is prerequisite for the other. Junior students with the requisite ability may take whichever sequence is offered that year. Then, as seniors, students may take the other sequence, rounding out a two-year sequence in advanced Latin.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      MA301

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics

    MA301 Algebra 3

  •      MA355

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    MA355 Precalculus and Modeling

    This course is devoted to developing a toolkit of functions that serves as a bridge between mathematics and the world it models. The toolkit includes explicitly defined functions such as exponential, polynomial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, as well as functions that are defined recursively and parametrically. Students investigate functions, bivariate data, and models with graphing calculators and computers. Both graphical and analytical approaches to problem solving are emphasized. Students also complete lab activities and present their results in formal written reports.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core engineering/computer science OR core mathematics credit

    MA358 Cryptography

    Crosslisted as CS358. This course introduces students to cryptographic methods used to encipher and decipher secret messages with an emphasis on using computer programming to automate the process. Through class discussions, problem solving, group activities, and programming assignments, students will learn a variety of encryption schemes ranging from the age of Caesar to modern public key encryption used to secure digital communications online. Students will learn introductory number theory and statistics to describe these methods and identify weaknesses that allow secret messages to be read without the key. Students will also master programming topics such as variables, functions, conditional logic, looping and recursion, and file input/output in the Python language to implement each cryptographic method. This course will utilize a blended learning environment with large portions of material being taught online and utilizing in class time for working in groups. Students will receive one unit of credit for this course, but the course will satisfy both the mathematics and engineering/computer science course requirement.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit

    MA360 Investigations in Calculus I

    This course introduces students to concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. The emphasis in this course is on understanding many of the big ideas of calculus through discovery labs and the use of technology. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. There is less of an emphasis on algebraic manipulation in this course compared to other calculus courses. Calculators and computers are frequently used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include rates of change, linear approximations, interpretations of the derivative, and the concept of a limit.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA362

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA360

    MA362 Investigations in Calculus II

    This course continues the study of differential calculus and introduces students to concepts of integral calculus and applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Emphasis in this course is on understanding many of the big ideas of calculus through discovery labs and the use of technology. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. There is less of an emphasis on algebraic manipulation in this course compared to other calculus courses. Calculators and computers are frequently used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include further interpretation and applications of the derivative, differential equations, and numerical integration.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA364

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit

    MA364 Investigations in Calculus III

    This course continues the study of integral calculus and applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Emphasis in this course is on understanding many of the big ideas of calculus through discovery labs and the use of technology. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. There is less emphasis on algebraic manipulation in this course compared to other calculus courses. Calculators and computers are frequently used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered in this trimester include techniques of integration as well as interpretation and applications of the integral.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA366

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): B or better in Math II Honors, or an A in Math II.

    MA366 Honors Math for Social Justice

    Mathematics for Social Justice offers students an overview of a number of applications of mathematics, especially those topics that relate to the concept of fair and just relations between the individual and society. Topics covered include fair division of resources and costs, voting methods, apportionment of legislative bodies, power of voting coalitions, graph theory and networks and recursive systems. The course will also extend students' knowledge of matrices and their use in applications related to the social sciences, as well as probability and univariate data analysis. Applications and modeling are central to this course of study. Students are expected to be involved in formulating and modeling problems, applying the appropriate mathematics to find solutions, and evaluating those solutions. Computers and calculators are incorporated as computational modeling aids. Activities in this course include lectures, weekly synchronous class meetings, discussions, projects, group activities and assessments.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 8:30pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional

  •      MA368

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA355b
    Related Links: MA355b

    MA368 Finite Mathematics

    This course offers an overview of many applications of mathematics, especially in the social and management sciences. Topics covered include a selection of the following: fair division of resources and costs, voting methods, apportionment of legislative bodies, power of voting coalitions, finance, probability with Markov chains, linear programming, game theory, and mathematical models using matrices. Students are expected to be involved in formulating problems, applying the appropriate mathematics to find a solution, and evaluating the solution. Computers and calculators are incorporated as computational and modeling aids.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA370

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA355 Precalculus and Modeling.
    Related Links: MA355c

    MA370 Advanced Algebra Applications

    This course is intended to be an immediate predecessor to a college calculus course. It is designed to reinforce the algebra skills required for success in calculus while applying them to a variety of topics not normally covered in high school precalculus, though still required in many college calculus courses. These topics may include conic sections, complex numbers, polar coordinates, spatial coordinate geometry, parametric equations, linear transformations of points and figures in the plane, or others. This course is intended for students who have not taken calculus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA372

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit

    MA372 Explorations in Advanced Geometry

    In this course students investigate areas of geometry beyond those included in a one-year high school geometry course. Topics focus on the theory of constructability and proof; periodic and non-periodic tilings; three-dimensional geometry, including investigation of Platonic and Archimedean solids; and modeling through geometry. Students also explore selected topics independently. Emphasis is placed on gaining an intuitive understanding of geometry as well as communicating and applying that understanding through projects, presentations, papers, extended problems, and daily discussion.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      MA402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Student must have earned at least a B in MA355 Precalculus & Modeling
    Related Links: MA355c

    MA402 Introduction to Data Science

    Students will learn some of the functions and features of the R programming language, especially as they relate to summarizing and manipulating large data sets--for example, by extracting subsets, constructing new variables from old ones, or merging data sets. They'll learn how to formulate questions by examining large data sets using such tools. They'll learn to construct statistical models that predict some variables given others, and to assess the quality of these models. They'll learn to write reports that clearly present their questions, analytical approaches, and conclusions.

    Meeting Times:
    Four days a week including lab

  •      MA404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA355c
    Related Links: MA355c

    MA404 AP Statistics I

    This course is designed to teach students to think about problems from a statistical point of view. Topics begin with univariate data analysis, including summary statistics and graphical techniques, with emphasis on interpretation and communication. Additional topics covered include normal distributions, introductory topics in sampling and experimental design, and probability.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA404
    Related Links: MA404

    MA406 AP Statistics II

    This course continues the study of statistics, including topics in probability, sampling distributions, inference procedures for means and proportions, and chi-square tests for goodness of fit, homogeneity and independence. The course involves projects that require students to gather data and analyze results.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA406
    Related Links: MA406

    MA408 AP Statistics III

    This course completes the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus with initial focus on correlation, regression, and inference procedures for slope. After the AP examination, students work on topics beyond the AP syllabus and/or projects. MA404, MA406, MA408 constitute a comprehensive introduction to statistics and include all of the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA410

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): Course ending grade of B- or better in MA355 Precalculus & Modeling
    Related Links: MA355c

    MA410 AP Calculus AP (Advanced Topics I)

    This course introduces students to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include the derivative, techniques of differentiation, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, and the concept of a limit.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA412

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA410
    Related Links: MA410

    MA412 AP Calculus AP (Advanced Topics II)

    This course continues the study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include applications of the derivative, Euler's method, implicit differentiation and related rates, and the concepts of definite and indefinite integrals.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA414

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA412
    Related Links: MA412

    MA414 AP Calculus AP (Advanced Topics III)

    This course continues the study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include basic techniques of integration, calculating area and total change of a function, numerical approximations of integrals, separable differential equations, and other applications of definite integrals. MA410, MA412, MA414 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus AB syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA416

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): Pre-Calculus

    MA416 AP Calculus AB

    This is the first course in a two-course sequence. This demanding and challenging course covers the study and application of differentiation and integration, and graphical analysis including limits, asymptotes, and continuity. Learners will cover functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, transcendental functions and special integration methods and their applications. During the semester, learners will use multiple representations, such as graphical, numerical, analytic, and verbal to foster a more complete understanding of calculus. Technology will be used to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions for confirming written work, facilitating experimentation, and assisting with interpretation of results. Learners will work independently, attend weekly group sessions using web conferencing, and engage in group activities on campus. Evaluation will consist of online quizzes, problem sets (POWs), proctored tests and quizzes, and a final exam. AP Calculus AB will prepare learners for the continuation of our NCSSM Online Calculus sequence AP Calculus BC (MA426).

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: •Completion of Pre-Calculus (or equivalent) with a grade of B+ or higher • The ability to be an independent learner in a high-level mathematics course. • Possession and knowledge of using the TI-83/ TI-83 Plus, TI-84/TI-84 Plus, TI-89, or TINspire calculators. The course is taught from the perspective of the TI-84 series of calculators.

  •      MA420

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s):
    Related Links: MA355c

    MA420 AP Calculus BC (I) Contemporary Calculus

    This course introduces students to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include the derivative, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, some applications of the derivative, l'Hopital's rule and the concept of a limit. MA420 MA422, MA424 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus BC syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA422

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA420
    Related Links: MA420

    MA422 AP Calculus BC (II) Contemporary Calculus

    This course continues the study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include additional applications of the derivative, an introduction to differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, definite and indefinite integrals, numerical approximations of integrals, calculating area and total change of a function, and some applications of integrals. Students also focus on skills necessary for success on the AP BC Calculus examination. MA420 MA422, MA424 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus BC syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      MA424

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA422
    Related Links: MA422

    MA424 AP Calculus BC (III) Contemporary Calculus

    This course continues the study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include additional discussion of Taylor series, additional techniques of integration, improper integrals, and more applications of integrals. MA420 MA422, MA424 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus BC syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA426

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): AP Calculus AB

    MA426 AP Calculus BC

    The second course in a two-course sequence, AP Calculus BC covers much of the second semester of a college-level calculus course. This demanding and challenging course, AP Calculus BC, is the equivalent of a college-level second semester in calculus. The course covers all topics in The College Board's AP Calculus BC curriculum, developing the important concepts in differential and integral calculus and then using these fundamentals to polynomial approximations and series, vectors, polar functions, and parametric equations. During the semester, students will explore concepts graphically, numerically, and analytically (algebraically) so as to foster a more complex understanding of calculus. This course is intended for students who have a willingness to learn calculus at a very rapid pace and exceptionally good study habits. This course will prepare students to sit for the administration of the Calculus BC Advanced Placement Exam.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Wednesday, 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skill: Successful completion of MA416 • The ability to be an independent learner in a high-level mathematics course. • Possession and knowledge of using the TI-83/ TI-83 Plus, TI-84/TI-84 Plus, TI-89, or TINspire calculators. The course is taught from the perspective of the TI-84 series of calculators.

  •      MA430

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): For Seniors: Course-ending grade of B+ or higher in MA355
    Related Links: MA355c, MA355c

    MA430 AP Calc BC (Adv Topics I)

    This course provides students with a fast-paced introduction to the concepts of differential calculus and the applications of calculus to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include the derivative, local linearity of functions, linear approximations, some applications of the derivative, l'Hopital's rule and the concept of a limit. MA430, MA432, and MA434 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus BC syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA432

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA430
    Related Links: MA430

    MA432 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics II) Contemporary Calculus

    This course continues the accelerated study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include additional applications of the derivative, an introduction to differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, definite and indefinite integrals, numerical approximations of integrals, calculating area and total change of a function, and some applications of integrals. Students also focus on skills necessary for success on the AP BC Calculus examination. MA430, MA432, and MA434 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus BC syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      MA434

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA432
    Related Links: MA432

    MA434 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics III) Contemporary Calculus

    This course continues the accelerated study of calculus and its applications to mathematical modeling. Through class discussions, problem solving, laboratory experiences, and writing assignments students discover the important concepts of calculus, develop an understanding of these concepts, and use these concepts in solving realistic problems. This course generally includes the completion of a substantial mathematical modeling project. Calculators and computers are used as tools in the course. Topics normally covered include additional discussion of Taylor series and power series, additional techniques of integration, improper integrals, and more applications of integrals. MA430, MA432, and MA434 constitute a comprehensive study of calculus and include all of the topics on the AP Calculus BC syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA436

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics credit
    Corequisite(s): MA434

    MA436 Advanced Probability Models

    This course introduces students to some advanced methods for modeling data, including parameter estimation and model selection. Students study poisson point processes in time and space; binomial, poisson, Gaussian, and other probability models; likelihood ratios and Bayes as decision-making tools; and the Metropolis algorithm for estimating Bayesian posterior probability distributions.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA440

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Corequisite(s): MA420 or MA430

    MA440 AP Statistics (Advanced Topics I)

    This course gives advanced students an opportunity to study the ideas and topics in MA404 AP Statistics (I) in greater depth and at a faster pace. More emphasis is placed on the development of the mathematical underpinnings, especially those related to calculus and to the theory of statistics. Additional topics such as multiple regression are selected to supplement the course. MA440, MA442, and MA444 constitute a comprehensive introduction to statistics and include all of the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA440
    Related Links: MA440

    MA442 AP Statistics (Advanced Topics II)

    This course is a faster-paced and more in-depth study of the topics in MA406 AP Statistics (II). More emphasis is placed on the development of the mathematical underpinnings of the expected value theorems and the introductory inference procedures. More sophisticated applications of probability are also included. The course involves project work that requires students to design and carry out experiments and analyze results. MA440, MA442, and MA444 constitute a comprehensive introduction to statistics and include all of the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA442
    Related Links: MA442

    MA444 AP Statistics (Advanced Topics III)

    This course is a faster-paced and more in-depth study of the topics in MA408 AP Statistics (III). More emphasis is placed on the development of the mathematical underpinnings, especially those related to calculus and to the theory of statistics. Additional topics such as analysis of variance are selected to supplement the course. The course involves project work that requires students to design and carry out experiments and analyze results. MA440, MA442, and MA444 constitute a comprehensive introduction to statistics and include all of the topics on the AP Statistics syllabus.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA446

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MA446 Advanced Mathematical Problem Solving I

    This one-trimester course covers sophisticated mathematical topics and how they can be helpful in solving challenging problems in competitions such as the Mathematical Olympiads. Students work on problem sets each week. Students may enroll in and receive credit for any, or all, of these one-trimester courses and each course is repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week

  •      MA448

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MA448 Advanced Mathematical Problem Solving II

    This one-trimester course covers sophisticated mathematical topics and how they can be helpful in solving challenging problems in competitions such as the Mathematical Olympiads. Students work on problem sets each week. Students may enroll in and receive credit for any, or all, of these one-trimester courses and each course is repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week

  •      MA450

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MA450 Advanced Mathematical Problem Solving III

    This one-trimester course covers sophisticated mathematical topics and how they can be helpful in solving challenging problems in competitions such as the Mathematical Olympiads. Students work on problem sets each week. Students may enroll in and receive credit for any, or all, of these one-trimester courses and each course is repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week

  •      MA452

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): A previous course in high school geometry.

    MA452 Explorations in Advanced Geometry with Topics

    The topics and ideas of MA372 Explorations in Advanced Geometry are presented in greater depth, at a faster pace, and with a more analytical focus. Some topics are explored more extensively and additional topics may be selected to supplement course materials. Students are expected to work more independently than they would in MA372.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      MA454

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Corequisite(s): MA434

    MA454 Modeling with Differential Equations

    In this course students examine what differential equations are and how they are used to model real-world phenomena. They also look at different techniques for solving differential equations and interpret their solutions in a real world context. Analytical methods, geometric methods, and numerical methods are included. Technology is an important component of the course.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA456

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Corequisite(s): MA434

    MA456 Numerical Analysis

    This course, which requires familiarity with a programming language, introduces students to the theory and practice of computational methods to analyze mathematical problems. Topics include computer arithmetic and computational error, function approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, curve-fitting, solving non-linear equations and systems of equations, and numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations. This course is the equivalent of a one-semester university course in numerical analysis.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week.

  •      MA458

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): AP Calculus BC

    MA458 Honors Complex Systems

    This course is a survey of topics involving complex systems. Some of the topics studied in the course are fractals and iterated function systems, chaos and chaotic behavior, cellular automata and self-organization, genetic algorithms and neural networks. Students are expected to create a final project selected from the topics studied. JAVA applets and computer programs are essential tools of the course. Familiarity with programming is advantageous but not necessary.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Tuesday and Thursday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      MA458

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Corequisite(s): MA422 or MA432

    MA458 Introduction to Complex Systems

    This course is a survey of topics involving complex systems. Some of the topics studied in the course are fractals and iterated function systems, chaos and chaotic behavior, cellular automata and self-organization, genetic algorithms and neural networks. Students are expected to create a final project selected from the topics studied. JAVA applets and computer programs are essential tools of the course. Familiarity with programming is advantageous but not necessary.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA460

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Mathematics

    MA460 Number Theory

    Selected topics from number theory, an advanced area of mathematics, are studied. They include divisibility properties of integers, special properties of prime numbers, congruences, Euler's Phi function, and some applications to fields such as cryptography and computer science. The concept of proof is developed over the trimester and students work to improve their ability to read and write mathematics. Students with programming experience are encouraged to use this tool to investigate some of the ideas presented in the course. Strong interest and talent in mathematics are required.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week.

  •      MA462

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA422 or MA432
    Related Links: MA422, MA432

    MA462 Modeling with Matrices

    This introduction to linear algebra develops the arithmetic and algebra matrices and how matrices and matrix operations can be used to model a variety of real-world phenomena. While focusing on applications, the course considers linear transformations, Euclidean vector spaces and inner product spaces, and eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Models include least squares, Fourier analysis, CT scans, morphs, and age specific growth models.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA464

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit

    MA464 Combinatorics and Game Theory

    This is a college-level mathematics course that introduces students to some of the major topics in combinatorics. Topics include permutations and combinations, binomial and multinomial expansions, inclusion-exclusion, methods of generating functions, recursive equations, and economic game theory. Strong interest and talent in mathematics are required.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA466

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit

    MA466 Graph Theory and Introduction to Proof

    This college-level mathematics course has a dual purpose. We develop the theory and application of graphs, a major area of modern mathematics, and also provide an introduction to mathematical proof. Students develop their ability to make thoughtful conjectures, and to verify those conjectures with valid mathematical arguments. This is done by considering questions of graph structures and colorings, tree and path optimization, matrix representations, and some open questions in the field. Included is a two-week investigation of an open problem in which students demonstrate their ability to make conjectures and to write concise, complete, and coherent proofs. Strong interest and talent in mathematics are required.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA468

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA458
    Related Links: MA458

    MA468 Structure and Dynamics of Modern Networks

    In the past ten years, a new area in science and mathematics has arisen. The science of networks is the science of the real world – the world of people, friendships, disease, firms, and financial crisis. We are connected in a small world with six degrees of separation, and this fact must affect our understanding of the world. Unlike calculus, this new area of mathematics is not yet complete. Though it has just begun to be developed, the way it is changing how we model the world and the mathematical tools we need is startling. This course investigates the mathematics of networks and systems. We consider the mathematical bases for social networks, computer networks, biological networks, economic networks, and small world networks and their applications. This course requires reading original sources and modern research.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA470

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Corequisite(s): MA430 and Senior Standing

    MA470 Mathematical Modeling

    Senior students with advanced mathematical knowledge are introduced to the creative and analytic aspects of modeling real-world phenomena. Models from engineering, biology, political science, management science, and everyday life are examined through a variety of techniques. When presented with a situation, students learn to develop, test, and revise an appropriate model. The course is project-oriented and focuses on applying the mathematics students already know. Group work is required, and students present their work in extensive written reports.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      MA472

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Research Program Application

    MA472 Research in Mathematics I

    This course is designed for students who have completed calculus and would like to work on a research team investigating an unsolved problem in mathematics. Since the research questions usually arise from the fields of graph theory and complex systems, students are encouraged to complete MA466 Graph Theory and Networks and MA458 Introduction to Complex Systems prior to enrolling in MA472 or to have completed comparable coursework in 9th or 10th grade. It is also recommended that students enroll in the Research in Mathematics Mini-term in junior year. The work of the research team typically begins in spring of junior year and students are expected to make significant progress on the problem over the summer on their own. The research concludes in fall of the senior year with MA474 Research in Mathematics II.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      MA474

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA472 or MA490
    Related Links: MA472, MA490

    MA474 Research in Mathematics II

    This course continues the project begun in MA472. Students write a formal paper presenting the background of the problem and any prior results found by other researchers. The students' results are then presented in standard mathematical form with all necessary detail in the proofs and corollaries presented. If the students' results warrant, the paper may be submitted for publication.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      MA476

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Mathematics

    MA476 Abstract Algebra

    Selected topics from abstract algebra and group theory. Topics include groups, cyclic groups, isomorphisms, normal sub-groups, Lagrange's Theorem, and the Fundamental Theorem of Finite Abelian Groups. The concept of proof is developed over the trimester and students work to improve their ability to read and write mathematics. Strong interest and achievement in mathematics is required.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week.

  •      MA478

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Mathematics

    MA478 Advanced Combinatorics and Game Theory

    This college-level mathematics course assumes familiarity with basic combinatorial reasoning. Students who have previously studied combinatorics for mathematics competitions or in a summer program will enhance their understanding and are encouraged to take this course. Topics include set and integer partitions, Fibonacci, Lucas and Stirling numbers, permutation groups, Polya and Burnside theorems, and posets. Combinatorial games will also be studied. Strong interest and talent in mathematics, and prior experience with combinatorial reasoning are required.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA480

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA434 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics III)
    Related Links: MA434, MA454, MA456, MA460, MA462, MA464, MA466, MA476

    MA480 Vector Functions and Partial Derivatives

    This is the first half of a university-level course in multivariable calculus. This course includes the theory and application of vector functions and partial derivatives. Topics include a vector approach to regression modeling, the Frenet-Serret equations, continuity and differentiability of functions of several variables, gradients and directional derivatives, and classic optimization problems. Numerical methods such as Newton's Method for solving non-linear systems and modeling with vector-valued functions of scalar and scalar-valued functions of a vector are included.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA482

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MA480 Vector Functions and Partial Derivatives
    Related Links: MA480

    MA482 Multiple Integral and Vector Fields

    This is the second half of a university-level course in multivariable calculus. This course includes the theory and application of multiple integrals and vector fields. Topics include multiple integrals, the Jacobian and change of variables, and line and surface integrals. Significant time is devoted to consideration of Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. Numerical methods such as Simpson's Rule for volumes under a surface and modeling with vector-valued functions of a vector are included.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      MA484

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): AP Calculus BC and earned a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC Exam

    MA484 Honors Multivariable Calculus I with Applications

    This is the first half of a university-level course in multivariable calculus. This course includes the theory and application of vector functions and partial derivatives. Topics include basic operations with vectors and parametric curves in 2- and 3-space, the Frenet Frame and Frenet-Serret equations, continuity and differentiability of functions of several variables, gradients and directional derivatives, and classic optimization problems. Additional topics and projects will be added throughout the course to explore interesting applications of calculus and differential equations.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Wednesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional

  •      MA486

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Mathematics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Honors Multivariable Calculus I with Applications

    MA486 Honors Multivariable Calculus II with Applications

    Students will continue their study of multivariable calculus including multiple integrals, the Jacobian and change of variables, vector fields, line and surface integrals, divergence and curl. Significant time is devoted to the study of Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem and the Divergence Theorem. Students will be expected to use formal mathematical proofs and to work on extended problem sets. Additional topics and projects will be added throughout the course to explore interesting applications of calculus and differential equations.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Wednesday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      MA490

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Mathematics

    MA490 Advanced Mathematical Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in mathematics to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. The topic chosen may be in mathematics or a mathematical study of another field. Students are expected to make formal presentations and to write a paper on the topic. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in mathematics or who wish to do independent research in mathematics. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MA492

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Mathematics

    MA492 Advanced Mathematical Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in mathematics to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. The topic chosen may be in mathematics or a mathematical study of another field. Students are expected to make formal presentations and to write a paper on the topic. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in mathematics or who wish to do independent research in mathematics. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MA494

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Mathematics
    Credits: One unit core mathematics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Dean of Mathematics

    MA494 Advanced Mathematical Topics

    This course offers an opportunity for students with an especially strong background in mathematics to pursue a rigorous study of a topic outside the standard curriculum. The topic chosen may be in mathematics or a mathematical study of another field. Students are expected to make formal presentations and to write a paper on the topic. This course is intended for students who have exhausted the other course offerings in mathematics or who wish to do independent research in mathematics. Repeatable for credit.

  •      MS312

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): If online students choose to study the piano, they should have regular and ready access to a piano. Guitars will be provided to online students who choose to study the guitar.

    MS312 MS312 Classical Piano and Guitar Theory and Practice

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a trimester examination, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit. [Special opportunity for ONLINE STUDENTS for the 2019-2020 academic year: This course will be piloted for a limited number of NCSSM Online Students as an opportunity for BEGINNING Guitar or Piano Students with little or no experience on the instrument. This is a PILOT program that has many years of success in the residential format. Online student participants will provide feedback on the experience as we learn best practices. Students will interact with the instructor via video, web meetings, and Google Classroom.]

    Meeting Times:
    Individual Zoom Sessions Scheduled

  •      MS312

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS312 Classical Piano and Guitar: Theory and Practice

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a trimester examination, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS314

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): If online students choose to study the piano, they should have regular and ready access to a piano. Guitars will be provided to online students who choose to study the guitar.

    MS314 MS314 Classical Piano and Guitar Theory and Practice

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a trimester examination, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit. [Special opportunity for ONLINE STUDENTS for the 2019-2020 academic year: This course will be piloted for a limited number of NCSSM Online Students as an opportunity for BEGINNING Guitar or Piano Students with little or no experience on the instrument. This is a PILOT program that has many years of success in the residential format. Online student participants will provide feedback on the experience as we learn best practices. Students will interact with the instructor via video, web meetings, and Google Classroom.]

    Meeting Times:
    Individual Zoom Sessions Scheduled

  •      MS314

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS314 Classical Piano and Guitar: Theory and Practice

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a trimester examination, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS316

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS316 Classical Piano and Guitar: Theory and Practice

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a trimester examination, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS316

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite(s): If online students choose to study the piano, they should have regular and ready access to a piano. Guitars will be provided to online students who choose to study the guitar.

    MS316 MS316 Classical Piano and Guitar Theory and Practice

    This course is a comprehensive study of instrumental music and theory through the idioms of piano and guitar. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn the music repertoire and performance practice of guitar or piano. Students learn playing technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and pitch. Students choose guitar or piano as their primary instrument. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, a trimester examination, and in-class performances. There is no prerequisite for this course. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit. [Special opportunity for ONLINE STUDENTS for the 2019-2020 academic year: This course will be piloted for a limited number of NCSSM Online Students as an opportunity for BEGINNING Guitar or Piano Students with little or no experience on the instrument. This is a PILOT program that has many years of success in the residential format. Online student participants will provide feedback on the experience as we learn best practices. Students will interact with the instructor via video, web meetings, and Google Classroom.]

    Meeting Times:
    Individual Zoom Sessions Scheduled

  •      MS322

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS322 Music Theory and Composition

    This course provides an understanding of classical and contemporary trends in music composition. Students learn fundamental concepts of music theory while learning how to use the latest technologies in musical notation. Students explore songwriting and music composition for various instruments. After understanding fundamental concepts and developing basic skills, students recognize and analyze contemporary trends in music composition and compose and arrange their own music.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week with additional asynchronous online components.

  •      MS336

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS336 Audio and Digital Music Production

    This course employs “hands-on” discovery and application of concepts in music production in the digital realm, focusing on concepts in acoustics, creativity, and music production. Topics include: principles of acoustics, microphones, microphone techniques, digital recording, mixing consoles and mixing theory, production, effects and dynamics processing, stereo and multi-track editing, step sequencing, and open source software applications. Throughout the trimester, each student completes multiple recording, sequencing, and editing projects.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      MS350

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS350 Jazz Performance Workshop

    This course is a comprehensive study of jazz music and theory. Students focus on the study of jazz literature, jazz styles, and improvisational skills. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn jazz literature, theory, and performance practice. Students learn jazz technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and style. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, and in-class performances with public performances scheduled as appropriate. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS352

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS352 Jazz Performance Workshop

    This course is a comprehensive study of jazz music and theory. Students focus on the study of jazz literature, jazz styles, and improvisational skills. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn jazz literature, theory, and performance practice. Students learn jazz technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and style. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, and in-class performances with public performances scheduled as appropriate. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MS354 Jazz Performance Workshop

    This course is a comprehensive study of jazz music and theory. Students focus on the study of jazz literature, jazz styles, and improvisational skills. Largely self-paced, this course provides students the opportunity to learn jazz literature, theory, and performance practice. Students learn jazz technique, note reading, chords, harmony, rhythm, and style. The course includes written music theory assignments, assigned songs to learn and perform for the instructor, and in-class performances with public performances scheduled as appropriate. Students of all levels and experience are eligible. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS363

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MS336 Audio and Digital Music Production
    Related Links: MS336

    MS363 Advanced Audio Recording Technology

    This course is a continuation of MS336 Audio and Digital Music Production. This course includes advanced topics such as multi-track digital editing, advanced mixing theory, a variety of recording sessions, and live sound support. Students are expected to complete a major recording project during the course of the trimester.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      MS402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): MS322 Music Theory and Compostion
    Related Links: MS322

    MS402 AP Music Theory

    This course is a continuation of MS322 Music Theory and Composition with an emphasis on preparation for the AP Music Theory exam. Major concepts include musical terminology, analysis, ear training, four-part writing for orchestra and voice, and musical forms.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week with additional asynchronous online components.

  •      MU302

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU302 Chorale

    NCSSM's Chorale is a vocal ensemble that studies and performs a variety of standard choral literature. This ensemble performs masterworks of choral literature in collaboration annually with other NCSSM musical ensembles. Concepts emphasized include ensemble techniques, vocal production, solfeggio, note reading, and other aspects of choral music. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two evening class meetings. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU304

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU304 Chorale

    NCSSM's Chorale is a vocal ensemble that studies and performs a variety of standard choral literature. This ensemble performs masterworks of choral literature in collaboration annually with other NCSSM musical ensembles. Concepts emphasized include ensemble techniques, vocal production, solfeggio, note reading, and other aspects of choral music. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two evening class meetings. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU306

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU306 Chorale

    NCSSM's Chorale is a vocal ensemble that studies and performs a variety of standard choral literature. This ensemble performs masterworks of choral literature in collaboration annually with other NCSSM musical ensembles. Concepts emphasized include ensemble techniques, vocal production, solfeggio, note reading, and other aspects of choral music. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two evening class meetings. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU360 Wind Ensemble

    NCSSM's Wind Ensemble is an advanced wind band with an emphasis on standard wind band music literature and wind chamber music. Concepts emphasized include tone production, ensemble intonation, performance technique, and musical interpretation. Students interested in symphony orchestra literature are selected by audition to rehearse and perform with the NCSSM Orchestra on a regular basis. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab plus one evening class meeting. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU362

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU362 Wind Ensemble

    NCSSM's Wind Ensemble is an advanced wind band with an emphasis on standard wind band music literature and wind chamber music. Concepts emphasized include tone production, ensemble intonation, performance technique, and musical interpretation. Students interested in symphony orchestra literature are selected by audition to rehearse and perform with the NCSSM Orchestra on a regular basis. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab plus one evening class meeting. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU364

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU364 Wind Ensemble

    NCSSM's Wind Ensemble is an advanced wind band with an emphasis on standard wind band music literature and wind chamber music. Concepts emphasized include tone production, ensemble intonation, performance technique, and musical interpretation. Students interested in symphony orchestra literature are selected by audition to rehearse and perform with the NCSSM Orchestra on a regular basis. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab plus one evening class meeting. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU370

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU370 Orchestra

    The NCSSM Orchestra is a string orchestra with an emphasis on masterpieces of string and symphony orchestra music literature. Concepts emphasized include performance technique, tone production, ensemble intonation, musical interpretation, and advanced string technique. Winds and percussion are added to the string section from the Wind Ensemble as required by the literature selected for performance. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab plus one evening class meeting. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU372

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU372 Orchestra

    The NCSSM Orchestra is a string orchestra with an emphasis on masterpieces of string and symphony orchestra music literature. Concepts emphasized include performance technique, tone production, ensemble intonation, musical interpretation, and advanced string technique. Winds and percussion are added to the string section from the Wind Ensemble as required by the literature selected for performance. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab plus one evening class meeting. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      MU374

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: Music
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    MU374 Orchestra

    The NCSSM Orchestra is a string orchestra with an emphasis on masterpieces of string and symphony orchestra music literature. Concepts emphasized include performance technique, tone production, ensemble intonation, musical interpretation, and advanced string technique. Winds and percussion are added to the string section from the Wind Ensemble as required by the literature selected for performance. Interested students are encouraged to register for all three trimesters of this course. Repeatable for credit.

    Meeting Times:
    Two periods per week including lab plus one evening class meeting. Some scheduled weekend rehearsals and weekend concerts.

  •      PA102

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA102 Disc Golf

    These courses provide instruction in the history of the game, basic skills and fundamental techniques, rules, etiquette, tactics, strategy, and scoring. Emphasis is placed on student safety and proper care of equipment. Through individual and/or group practice and opportunities for play, students develop skill in the sport. Instruction is geared to beginners, so students are not required to have previous knowledge of the sport or experience playing the sport. However, students are expected to make a full commitment to learning the game and developing physical skill in the sport. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA104

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA104 Archery

    These courses provide instruction in the history of the game, basic skills and fundamental techniques, rules, etiquette, tactics, strategy, and scoring. Emphasis is placed on student safety and proper care of equipment. Through individual and/or group practice and opportunities for play, students develop skill in the sport. Instruction is geared to beginners, so students are not required to have previous knowledge of the sport or experience playing the sport. However, students are expected to make a full commitment to learning the game and developing physical skill in the sport. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA108

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA108 Ultimate Frisbee

    These courses provide instruction in the history of the game, basic skills and fundamental techniques, rules, etiquette, tactics, strategy, and scoring. Emphasis is placed on student safety and proper care of equipment. Through individual and/or group practice and opportunities for play, students develop skill in the sport. Instruction is geared to beginners, so students are not required to have previous knowledge of the sport or experience playing the sport. However, students are expected to make a full commitment to learning the game and developing physical skill in the sport. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA112

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA112 Tennis

    These courses provide instruction in the history of the game, basic skills and fundamental techniques, rules, etiquette, tactics, strategy, and scoring. Emphasis is placed on student safety and proper care of equipment. Through individual and/or group practice and opportunities for play, students develop skill in the sport. Instruction is geared to beginners, so students are not required to have previous knowledge of the sport or experience playing the sport. However, students are expected to make a full commitment to learning the game and developing physical skill in the sport. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA118

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA118 Racquetball

    These courses provide instruction in the history of the game, basic skills and fundamental techniques, rules, etiquette, tactics, strategy, and scoring. Emphasis is placed on student safety and proper care of equipment. Through individual and/or group practice and opportunities for play, students develop skill in the sport. Instruction is geared to beginners, so students are not required to have previous knowledge of the sport or experience playing the sport. However, students are expected to make a full commitment to learning the game and developing physical skill in the sport. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA126

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA126 Badminton

    These courses provide instruction in the history of the game, basic skills and fundamental techniques, rules, etiquette, tactics, strategy, and scoring. Emphasis is placed on student safety and proper care of equipment. Through individual and/or group practice and opportunities for play, students develop skill in the sport. Instruction is geared to beginners, so students are not required to have previous knowledge of the sport or experience playing the sport. However, students are expected to make a full commitment to learning the game and developing physical skill in the sport. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA128

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA128 Fit for Life

    This course is for those who are serious about getting in shape through extremely rigorous exercise. The curriculum is modeled after the P90X workout system and focus is on overall toning and strengthening of the entire body. Every two weeks students participate in a different workout including resistance training, plyometrics, kickboxing, pilates, abdominal exercises, cardio strengthening, and yoga. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA130

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA130 Mountain Biking

    This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the outdoors of North Carolina while participating in physical fitness activities. Students learn to successfully ride on the road, greenways, and light terrain trails. The class includes traveling to local-area trails for cycling. Bicycles are provided to students enrolled in this class. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA132

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA132 Broadway Dance

    This course introduces students to the history and dances of some of the most famous Broadway musicals. The focus is on musicals from the 1950's to the present day. Students participate each week in technique classes. Students learn the historical context of musicals and research a topic in musical theater. Students have the opportunity to choreograph their own Broadway dance. No previous dance experience is necessary. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA134

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA134 Advanced Dance Techniques I

    This course is for students with at least five years of dance experience. The focus is on refinement of technical skills in modern dance and ballet and jazz at the advanced level, including complex movement capabilities, rhythmic structures, and spatial designs, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. Progressively more sophisticated aspects of space, time, and energy are explored. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly. Students may take this course and/or PA154 Advanced Dance Techniques II or PA164 Advanced Dance Techniques II in any order. None is prerequisite for the others.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA136

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA136 Hiking

    This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the outdoors of North Carolina while participating in physical fitness activities. Learn about proper hiking gear, basics for safety, trip plans, and how to research trails in the local area. The class includes traveling to local-area trails for hikes. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA138

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA138 Dance Appreciation

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of ballet, modern, jazz, hip hop, improvisation, choreography, and social and international folk dance. This is a broad overview of dance as an art form. Students learn how one technique evolved into the next. Students participate each week in technique classes incorporating international folk dance, social dance, ballet, modern, jazz, and hip hop. This course familiarizes students with practices, philosophies, terminologies, and styles of dance. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA140

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA140 Self Defense

    This course introduces students to personal safety and awareness. Topics of study include the recognition of dangerous situations and instruction in basic self defense moves and counters. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA142

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA142 Weight Training for Sports and Fitness

    This course provides instruction in the fundamental techniques, principles, and concepts in weight training. Emphasis is on utilizing proper form with each exercise involving resistance to safely obtain increased muscle tone, endurance, strength, or power. Besides performing weight training to become toned, shaped, or stronger, students can design and execute a program specifically geared to enhancing performance in a sport, or to meet other personal fitness goals. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA144

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA144 Zumba

    This course is for students who want to have fun while working out. Zumba is a dance-fitness program that combines traditional Latin dance styles, including salsa, mambo, cha-cha, cumbia and merengue, as well as hip-hop and belly dancing. During each class, students participate in a high energy cardiovascular aerobic workout followed by strength training, abdominal workouts and stretching. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA146

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA146 Pilates and Yoga

    Students learn the fundamentals of the Pilates method of exercise, along with basic Yoga movements and poses. Both systems of movement emphasize the use of breath to support mindful movement that develops strength and flexibility. The Pilates mat work is especially effective in the development of core strength, while the Yoga emphasizes flow, balance, and flexibility. No previous experience with Pilates or Yoga is required. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA148

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA148 Introduction to Fitness

    This course is for those who are new to regular exercise and interested in developing an individual exercise program. The curriculum includes kickboxing, jogging, biking, aerobics, weight lifting, and circuit training. The focus is on overall toning and strengthening of the entire body. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab

  •      PA150

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA150 Studio to Stage

    This course is for students who are interested in performing in our annual dance concerts. The focus is on dance technique and choreography. No experience necessary. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA152

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA152 Ballet

    This course is for students who are interested in ballet. Students learn coordination, musicality, and strength as well as ballet history, vocabulary, and choreography. No experience necessary. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA154

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA154 Advanced Dance Techniques II

    This course is for students with at least five years of dance experience and is a continuation of PA134 Advanced Dance Techniques I, although PA134 is not a prerequisite for this class. The focus is on further refinement of technical skills in modern dance and ballet and jazz at the advanced level, including complex movement capabilities, rhythmic structures, and spatial designs, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. Progressively more sophisticated aspects of space, time, and energy are explored. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly. Students may take this course and/or PA134 Advanced Dance Techniques I or PA164 Advanced Dance Techniques III in any order. None is prerequisite for the others.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA158

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA158 Couch to 5K

    This course is for students who are ready to get in shape through running. The focus is on cardio strength as well as overall body toning. Each class consists of walking and/or running followed by strength training, abdominal exercises, and stretching. Students are expected to be able to run a 5K by the end of the trimester. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab

  •      PA160

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA160 Circuit Training

    This course is designed for students interested in discovering an exciting way to workout and stay in shape. Circuit training combines strength training with high intensity cardiovascular exercises in a variety of combinations to target all muscle groups. Participants move quickly from one exercise to the next so there is no time for boredom. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab

  •      PA162

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA162 Rock Wall Climbing

    This course provides instruction in safe climbing skills. Learn about the indoor climbing wall in the Physical Education Center, different types of climbing, and basic climbing concepts and practices. As a part of the safe climbing component, we teach proper top rope belay technique, as well as correct use of harnesses and the figure-8-follow-through knot. All equipment is provided for this class. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA164

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA164 Advanced Dance Techniques III

    This course is for students with at least five years of dance experience and is a continuation of PA154 Advanced Dance Techniques II, although PA154 is not a prerequisite for this class. The focus is on further refinement of technical skills in modern dance and ballet and jazz at the advanced level, including complex movement capabilities, rhythmic structures, and spatial designs, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. Progressively more sophisticated aspects of space, time, and energy are explored. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly. Students may take this course and/or PA134 Advanced Dance Techniques I or PA154 Advanced Dance Techniques II in any order. None is prerequisite for the other.

    Meeting Times:
    One meeting per week including lab.

  •      PA166

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA166 TRX Suspension Training

    This course is for students interested in learning the proper techniques and benefits of TRX suspension training. This unique form of exercise uses your body weight to simultaneously develop strength, balance, flexibility, and core stability. The TRX equipment leverages gravity and the user's body weight to complete hundreds of cardio and strength training exercise. Students meet in class weekly for 90 minutes and are expected to participate in two additional weekly exercise sessions beyond the class meeting to comply with the Surgeon General's recommendation of three moderate exercise sessions weekly.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PA168

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit physical activity or additional elective credit

    PA168 POP Pilates

    This course is designed for students who want a high intensity, total body, equipment free workout that sculpts a rock solid core and a lean dancer's body. POP Pilates combined the fundamentals of traditional pilates with pop music which makes it feel like a dance on the mat.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      PH304

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    PH304 Astronomy

    This introductory astronomy course focuses on using observations to create predictive models. Physics and chemistry concepts are introduced as needed. Topics include the sky, seasons, phases of the moon, our solar system, and the search for extrasolar planets. Students use computers extensively to analyze data and access resources. Opportunities for binocular and nighttime sky observations are available. NOTE: Due to overlap of some content and mastery beyond the scope of this course, this is not an appropriate course for students who have completed PH418 Astrophysics.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week or two 90-minute evening class meetings.

  •      PH352

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    PH352 Waves, Sound and Optics

    This course investigates the physics and application of waves, with emphasis on sound and light waves. We will study how waves are produced, travel, and interact with materials, how sound waves are used to create music, and how light waves are used in technologies including microscopes, spectrometers, interferometers, and lasers. Topics covered include wave properties; wave behaviors including reflection, refraction, interferences, and diffraction; physics of music; geometric optics; and physics of color. The course has a strong lab component, and students will have the opportunity to complete several short projects.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      PH353

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): This is a three-trimester sequence. PH353a is the pre-req for PH353b. PH353b is the pre-req for PH353c.

    PH353 Physics

    This course provides an algebra-based foundation in the processes of physics, with an emphasis on qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Topics explored may include mechanics, wave motion, and electricity and magnetism. Laboratory activities, which are a key component of the course, are inquiry-based, meaning students design their own experiments in order to answer scientific questions and learn content by completing real-world projects and applications. Students also gain experience with scientific writing and communication.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab (trimester 1), Four periods per week including lab (trimesters 2 and 3).

    Requirements:
    Placement in this core course is determined by the Dean of Science.

  •      PH390

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    PH390 Research Experience in Physics (*R*)

    This introductory course is for students who want to pursue a research opportunity in physics. No previous physics coursework is required. During the first part of the course students learn to design and conduct an experiment, analyze data, and present their findings in a written paper. In addition, students read and discuss scientific literature, including publications of local professional scientists. When possible, a local scientist joins us in the laboratory for a hands-on, directed experiment. The second portion of the course is devoted to working in small groups on a research project. Research questions may be selected from an area identified by the instructor (examples: sports science, biomechanics, video analysis of different motion types, projectile motion), from questions selected from USAYPT (United States Association for Young Physicists Tournaments) problems for the current year's competition, or from topics proposed by the student, if appropriate. Students then write a final paper describing their research and make a formal oral and visual presentation of their findings.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      PH401

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2

    PH401 Physics with Advanced Topics (*M*)

    This course provides a precalculus-based foundation in the principles of general physics. The first term covers the laws of motion, force, momentum, and energy. In the second term students investigate the laws of electricity and magnetism, circuits and simple harmonic motion. The laboratory experience emphasizes the use of the computer in both the collection and the analysis of laboratory data. Activities in this course are designed to encourage the development of the following skills: excellence in qualitative and quantitative problem solving, independent learning from the course textbooks, careful and thoughtful experimental habits in lab, and proficiency in writing lab reports.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Placement into this core class is determined by the Dean of Science.

  •      PH402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Credits: One unit core physics credit
    Prerequisite(s): Modified exemption of the NCSSM core physics requriment and permission of the Dean of Science.

    PH402 Physics/Adv Topics II

    This course provides additional precalculus-based foundation in the principles of general physics for students who have already demonstrated proficiency in mechanics. Students investigate the laws of electricity and magnetism, circuits and simple harmonic motion. The laboratory experience emphasizes the use of the computer in both the collection and the analysis of laboratory data. Activities in this course are designed to encourage the development of the following skills: excellence in qualitative and quantitative problem solving, independent learning from the course textbooks, careful and thoughtful experimental habits in lab, and proficiency in writing lab reports.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      PH404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core physics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of A- or higher in PH353 Physics or final grade of B+ or higher in PH401 Physics with Advanced Topics or PH402 Physics with Advanced Topics II, or previous lab-based physics course and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: PH353c, PH355b, PH356, PH401b, PH402, EP2
    Corequisite(s): MA430

    PH404 AP Physics C: Mechanics (I)

    This course provides the completion of classical mechanics (in particular, the study of angular momentum and of gravitational fields) and an introduction to electric forces and fields, Gauss' law, capacitance, and voltage. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis and the course includes a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who are taking MA422 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics II). Completion of PH404 and this course may be used to prepare for the Mechanics portion of the AP C Physics examination, but its breadth and depth are significantly higher than that of a typical AP C Physics course.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      PH406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core physics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in PH404 AP Physics C: Mechanics (I).
    Related Links: PH404
    Corequisite(s): MA432

    PH406 AP Physics C: Mechanics (II)/Electricity and Magnetism (I)

    This course provides the completion of classical mechanics (in particular, the study of angular momentum and of gravitational fields) and an introduction to electric forces and fields, Gauss' law, capacitance, and voltage. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis and the course includes a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who are taking MA422 AP Calculus BC (Advanced Topics II). Completion of PH404 and this course may be used to prepare for the Mechanics portion of the AP C Physics examination, but its breadth and depth are significantly higher than that of a typical AP C Physics course.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      PH408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core physics or core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of B or higher in PH406 AP Physics C: Mechanics (II)/Electricity and Magnetism (I), MA422 AP Calculus BC (II).
    Related Links: PH406

    PH408 AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (II)

    This course continues the study of electromagnetism. Topics include electric circuits (R, RC, and RL), magnetism, Ampere's law, induction, and the Faraday/Lenz law. Emphasis is on the completion of the AP C Physics curriculum. Topics in geometrical and physical optics are offered after the completion of the AP syllabus. There is a strong problem-solving emphasis and the course includes a lab component. Calculus is used where needed and is treated at a level appropriate to students who have taken MA422 AP Calculus BC (II). Completion of PH406 and this course may be used to prepare for the electricity and magnetism portion of the AP C Physics examination. The breadth and depth of this course are significantly higher than that of a typical AP C physics course.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week including lab.

  •      PH410

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of A- or higher in PH353 Physics or final grade of B+ or higher in PH401 Physics with Advanced Topics or PH402 Physics with Advanced Topics II, or exemption from NCSSM core physics requirement, and permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: PH353c, PH401b, EP2, PH402

    PH410 Modern Physics

    This course continues the survey of physics developed since the start of the twentieth century. Topics are selected from special and general relativity, atomic and nuclear structure, radioactivity and nuclear reactions and elementary particles. Students may have the opportunity to participate in a weekend particle physics master class at Duke University.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      PH412

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    PH412 Computational Physics

    Students are introduced to basic methods of numerical analysis, and learn and write programs in the Python programming language to solve problems utilizing these methods. Students also create simulations of physics events both numerically and visually. (Note: this course does not satisfy laboratory science requirements for graduation, but may otherwise be taken for core elective credit.)

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      PH412

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): Honors Physics/ AP Physics/ Pre-Calculus

    PH412 Honors Computational Physics

    Students will be introduced to basic methods of numerical analysis and will learn to write programs in the Python programming language to solve and analyze physics problems utilizing these methods. Data from cutting edge physics will be analyzed, including particle physics from CERN, gravitational waves from LIGO, and products of cosmic rays. Students will also create simulations of physics events both numerically and visually using VPython. This course is typically offered at the upper undergraduate/graduate at most universities, and requires a strong physics background and at least 12 to 14 hours/week of dedicated time.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Thursday 8:00pm
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      PH414

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PH401 with a final grade of B+ or higher, or completion of PH404 and PH406 with a grade of B+ or higher, or exemption of NCSSM Physics, or permission of the Dean of Science.
    Related Links: PH401b, PH406, EP2

    PH414 Advanced Physics Problem Solving

    The course is for students who want to expand the range of physics problems they are able to solve. Students will solve problems in the areas of physics covered on the AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2 syllabi, with emphasis on topics not covered in NCSSM's core physics courses. Students will be expected to learn content from independent textbook readings and come to class prepared to discuss the material and apply it to solve problems. Topics covered may include rotational mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, wave motion, electromagnetism, optics, and other areas. Students will work in groups to solve problems in class and present their solutions, and will work additional problems for homework. Calculus is not required for problems addressed in this course. This course may be used to help students prepare to take the AP Physics 1 or AP Physics 2 exams, or to prepare for the International Physics Olympiad competition. Note - this course does not satisfy the lab science graduation requirement.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      PH416

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PH406 or PH401 with a B+ or higher, or PH353 with an A- or higher and any high school calculus course, or exemption of NCSSM Physics, or permission of Dean of Science.
    Related Links: PH401b, PH406, PH353c, EP2

    PH416 Quantum Mechanics

    This course provides an introduction to the quantum mechanical world where objects can behave as both waves and particles. It complements PH410 Modern Physics and goes into much more detail regarding the need for and development of quantum mechanics at the beginning of the previous century. The course covers concepts and applications of the Schrodinger equation to phenomena such as spectroscopy and radioactivity.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      PH418

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Final grade of A- or higher in PH353 Physics or B+ or higher in PH401 Physics with Advanced Topics or PH402 Physics with Advanced Topics II, or exemption from NCSSM core physics requirement, or permission of the Dean of Science, and MA355 Precalculus and Modeling.
    Related Links: PH307c, PH353c, PH401b, PH402, PH404, EP2

    PH418 Astrophysics

    This course uses ideas from physics (such as the properties of light, Newtonian gravity, and special and general relativity) to investigate topics such as the solar system, stars, and cosmology. Mathematical and numerical modeling is emphasized throughout the course as an important tool for astrophysicists. Students will have the opportunity to complete a project on a topic that they find particularly interesting. NOTE: Students who come to this course from PH353 will find it necessary to study some additional topics not taught in that course.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    NOTE: Students who come to this course from PH353 will find it necessary to study some additional topics not taught in that course.

  •      PH420

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): PH418 Astrophysics.
    Related Links: PH353, PH401, PH402

    PH420 Galaxies and Cosmology

    This course emphasizes the origin, structure, and evolution of massive stars and the events that lead to supernovas, black holes, and neutron stars. The origin, structure, and evolution of galaxies and the universe are also studied in detail. Students are expected to integrate physics and chemistry principles into the study of both stellar and galactic structure and evolution. Opportunities for telescope observation and image processing projects are available.

    Meeting Times:
    Five periods per week including lab.

  •      PH442

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in the Winter trimester. B or higher earned in one trimester of core physics at NCSSM, or exemption from NCSSM core physics requirement.
    Related Links: PH353a, PH355a, PH356, PH401, PH404, EP2

    PH442 Research in Physics I (*R*)

    This is an advanced course for second trimester junior students with the maturity, independence, and motivation necessary to conduct their own research project. Students learn the scientific method and experimental design before conducting a trial experiment on a small scale. Students then write a literature review on the topic of interest to them. Throughout the term students read from the primary scientific literature and participate in discussion groups on current issues in physics research. Based on the outcomes of the term's work, students may be given an opportunity to participate in summer research programs on campus or in the Triangle area. Students with a final grade of B or higher are expected to continue in PH444 Research in Physics II.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

    Requirements:
    Students with Junior standing apply in the Fall for entry in the Winter trimester.

  •      PH444

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): PH442
    Related Links: PH442

    PH444 Research in Physics II (*R*)

    Students write a detailed research proposal and defend it to a panel of their peers. Students begin to learn techniques and to gather data for their experiments.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      PH446

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): PH444
    Related Links: PH444

    PH446 Research in Physics III (*R*)

    Students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and conduct statistical analysis, as needed. They may research extension questions based on their original work. Students write a formal research paper and prepare a formal presentation. Students are required to present their results at the NCSSM Research Symposium in the spring and are encouraged to present their research at the North Carolina Student Academy of Science competition and other competitions.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      PH448

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Science
    Subject: Physics
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): PH446
    Related Links: PH446

    PH448 Research in Physics IV (*R*)

    In this course, students continue work on their previous research to produce additional data and analysis, as needed, or to research extension questions based on their original work. Students in this course have a leadership role in working with the junior students enrolled in Research in Physics and may serve as teaching assistants.

    Meeting Times:
    Eight periods per week including two labs.

  •      RE102

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit residential education credit

    RE102 Cornerstone: Foundational Life Skills

    Using a holistic education approach of self-discovery, self-realization, and wellness, this course helps students integrate into the life and culture of NCSSM and to establish the foundation necessary for academic and personal success in the classroom, in relationships, and in community living at NCSSM and beyond. Topics include time management, conflict management and healthy relationships, diversity, and resume-writing and interview skills.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      RE110

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit residential education credit
    Prerequisite(s): RE102
    Related Links: RE102

    RE110 Exploring Multicultural America

    This course explores how issues of race, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, and disability interact to form the diverse nation in which we live. Students learn the history of prejudice, discrimination, power, and privilege in the United States and discuss the impact it has on today's society. Students also reflect on their own experiences, identities and biases and how each has shaped their own worldview.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      RE112

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit residential education credit
    Prerequisite(s): RE102
    Related Links: RE102

    RE112 Public Speaking

    Public speaking aims to inform, convince, influence, persuade, or entertain a group of people. The development of public speaking skills, valuable in itself, can also contribute to one's self-confidence, organizational skills, listening skills, and anxiety-management. In this course, students learn to write and deliver effective speeches. This includes learning the effective use of presentation aids, supporting arguments, communication ethics, and speech organization. Successful completion of this course prepares the student for RE114 Public Speaking II.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      RE116

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit residential education credit
    Prerequisite(s): RE102
    Related Links: RE102

    RE116 Marketing You

    This course utilizes discussion and cooperative learning experiences to help students identify their strengths and learn how to best market themselves in the professional world. Focus is on using social media as a tool to identify promising career options, writing an effective resume, and learning techniques for professional interviews.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      RE118

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit residential education credit
    Prerequisite(s): RE102
    Related Links: RE102

    RE118 Excellence in Leadership

    As stated in the Disney Organizational Leadership (DOL) course description: “. . . as important as theory and application are to the learning process, it all begins with the heart and character of the leader.” Based on concepts from the (DOL) course, students assess their own leadership styles and practice various leadership techniques. Students examine the type of leadership required to create and maintain high levels of excellence on the individual level and in small group, organizational, and community environments.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      RE120

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit residential education credit
    Prerequisite(s): RE102
    Related Links: RE102

    RE120 Financial Planning

    Many high school and college graduates find themselves in serious financial trouble and in a debt cycle that can be difficult to reverse, causing the deferment or loss of some of their plans and dreams. Learning some simple and sound money management skills during high school can help students take charge of their financial future and can help set them on the path to realizing their important life goals. In this course, students learn basic money management skills such as budgeting, borrowing, earnings, investing, financial services, identity protection, and insurance. We teach practical application of these skills that students can put to immediate use.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      RE122

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Student Life
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit residential education credit
    Prerequisite(s): RE102
    Related Links: RE102

    RE122 NCSSM to College

    The course is designed to allow students to successfully transition from NCSSM to their future college or university environment. Designed to be taken in the third trimester junior year or the first trimester senior year, Transitioning to Higher Education prepares students through focusing on three key aspects of higher education: the college selection process, the college application process, and campus life. Lessons on the college selection process help students to identify types of colleges and universities, to understand how elements of a college or university may impact their educational experience, and to learn how to find colleges and universities that are a good fit for them. Lessons focused on the college application process are designed to help students understand deadlines and terms associated with the college application process, to connect students to resources to reduce costs, and to provide students an opportunity to gain experience developing applications and essays. Campus life lessons focus on the total cost of attending a college or university, programs on college campuses such as study abroad and living learning communities, and transitioning from the NCSSM experience to their unique college or university experience

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week.

  •      SE160

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    SE160 Sports Medicine I

    Students are introduced to the field of athletic training. Topics of study include basic anatomy/physiology, athletic training skills, and the recognition, management, and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      SE162

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SE160

    SE162 Sports Medicine I

    This course is a continuation of SE160 Sports Medicine I and may be of special interest to students who are contemplating a career in medicine. Topics include an in-depth study of the prevention, recognition, management, and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries.

    Meeting Times:
    One period per week including lab.

  •      SE352

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit

    SE352 Emergency Care of Illness and Injuries II

    This course prepares students to recognize and respond appropriately to cardiac, breathing, and First Aid emergencies. Students learn skills necessary to give immediate first aid and CPR or breathing until more advance medical personnel arrive and take over. We look at environmental conditions, mechanics and classification of injury, bloodborne pathogens and taking action. Along with the anatomy of injuries and preventive measures, students also learn how to take blood pressure, pulses and respiration.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      SE402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit additional elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SE352
    Related Links: SE352

    SE402 Emergency Care of Illness and Injuries I

    This course continues instruction, begun in SE352, in the proper response to cardiac, breathing, and First Aid emergencies. Along with learning the anatomy and immediate care of injuries and emergency situations of different sections of the body, we discuss shoulder, knee, elbow etc. The course considers equipment that could be applied help reduce injuries along with devices to assist in caring for an individual, such as spine board and air splints. We conclude with concussion assessment.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week.

  •      SEM102

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Special Study Options

    SEM102 Explorations In Math Modeling and Research Seminar

    This course is not available to dual enroll. The purpose of the .5 credit seminar is to give students the chance to think creatively about both applied and pure mathematical problems. This is not a typical math class. In most math courses, the focus is on learning a prescribed set of mathematical skills and ideas. In this seminar, the focus will be on learning to use mathematics students already know to tackle interesting and challenging problems. The first part of the seminar is about mathematical modeling. Students will work in groups to find and present solutions to interesting real-world problems. Along with this, they will learn about agent-based modeling and use the program NetLogo to explore these dynamic kinds of models. The second part of the course is devoted to exploration of an open research question in pure mathematics. Students will work on a selected problem related to graphs or mathematical games that is interesting enough to challenge mathematicians but accessible enough for high school students. Students will learn to break down complex problems into simpler questions, make conjectures, and write simple proofs. This will give students a small taste of what it is like to do research in pure mathematics. The seminar is intended for students who enjoy mathematics, enjoy working collaboratively, and are excited by the opportunity to think creatively about interesting mathematics problems

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesday 7:00pm
    No Online Weekend

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Students must have completed AP Calculus BC and earned a 5 on the AP exam AND/OR have successfully complete MA484 and MA486.

  •      SEM200

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Special Study Options
    Prerequisite(s): None

    SEM200 SEM200 Scholar Development: Cognitive and Metacognitive Skills

    SEM200

  •      SP305

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1

    SP305 Introductory Spanish

    Students embark on a journey of linguistic and cultural exploration as they take the first steps towards becoming proficient in Spanish. This course is for students who have not studied Spanish before or who have not yet completed a full year of introductory Spanish study in high school. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages that focus on the themes of self, family, friends, and everyday activities in the present tense. Students also learn to address the same themes within a limited introduction to the past tense. Cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world are interwoven throughout the course. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      SP307

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Prerequisite(s): SP305 Introductory Spanish or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP305c

    SP307 Intermediate Spanish

    The intermediate level of language study offers its own unique rewards, such as the ability to begin to read short stories and narratives, as well as the opportunity to enjoy and comprehend a wider array of media produced in Spanish. Students also begin to develop an appreciation for the nuances of the language. This is an accelerated second-year Spanish course designed for students who have had a full year of introductory Spanish study in high school or equivalent exposure to the language. Students learn to negotiate meaning among individuals, interpret written and spoken meaning, and to present meaning via oral and written messages primarily in the past tense. Reading short texts, viewing video programs, and using the language in everyday conversational situations further increases students' proficiency in the language. Most of the basic grammatical constructions are learned. Exploration of cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world is continued. Web-based exercises, videos, and songs aid students in their acquisition of grammatical concepts, new vocabulary, and listening skills.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      SP354

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP307 Intermediate Spanish or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP307c

    SP354 Advanced Spanish I

    In Advanced Spanish, the journey into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. In these three one-trimester courses, which constitute a third-year level of Spanish study, students explore the culture, history, society, and literature of various Spanish-speaking peoples as they continue to acquire proficiency in the language. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, and authentic literary selections, students improve their understanding of spoken Spanish and develop their speaking, reading, and writing abilities. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as family, society, and the natural world and its protection. These topics inform class discussions and debates, and serve as the basis for writing in Spanish.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      SP356

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP354 Advanced Spanish I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP354

    SP356 Advanced Spanish II

    In Advanced Spanish, the journey into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. In these three one-trimester courses, which constitute a third-year level of Spanish study, students explore the culture, history, society, and literature of various Spanish-speaking peoples as they continue to acquire proficiency in the language. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, and authentic literary selections, students improve their understanding of spoken Spanish and develop their speaking, reading, and writing abilities. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as family, society, and the natural world and its protection. These topics inform class discussions and debates, and serve as the basis for writing in Spanish.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      SP358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP354 Advanced Spanish II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP356

    SP358 Advanced Spanish III

    In Advanced Spanish, the journey into language continues but expands to encompass elements that reflect the breadth and depth of the Spanish-speaking world and its cultures. In these three one-trimester courses, which constitute a third-year level of Spanish study, students explore the culture, history, society, and literature of various Spanish-speaking peoples as they continue to acquire proficiency in the language. Through a rich program of original short films, audio activities, cultural readings, and authentic literary selections, students improve their understanding of spoken Spanish and develop their speaking, reading, and writing abilities. Classroom activities emphasize communication, allowing students to interact and apply what they are learning. An accompanying web-based program provides additional language exercises. The course content is theme-focused and speaks to current as well as perennial issues, such as family, society, and the natural world and its protection. These topics inform class discussions and debates, and serve as the basis for writing in Spanish.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      SP404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP358 Advanced Spanish III or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP358

    SP404 Readings in Spanish with Topics I

    These courses allow students to synthesize language, ideas and culture in new and rich ways. Conducted entirely in Spanish, these three one-trimester courses constitute a fourth-year level of Spanish study and are designed to serve as a bridge between language study and literature. The courses are an exploration of literature, culture, and society through a variety of genres, including brief narratives, excerpts, short stories, poetry, plays, non-literary selections, and the arts. Students develop an advanced vocabulary and improved reading comprehension. They discuss and write about the issues and themes presented in the readings as they explore different points-of-view and forms of creative expression. Students are invited to participate in the creative process by transforming their responses to assigned readings into drawings, paintings, and collages. Students develop their writing skills in personal and descriptive narratives as well as essays that compare and contrast or persuade. They learn to edit their writing through peer editing, by using an editing key, and through re-writes. Students review grammatical structures and make oral presentations.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SP406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP404 Readings in Spanish with Topics I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP404

    SP406 Readings in Spanish with Topics II

    These courses allow students to synthesize language, ideas and culture in new and rich ways. Conducted entirely in Spanish, these three one-trimester courses constitute a fourth-year level of Spanish study and are designed to serve as a bridge between language study and literature. The courses are an exploration of literature, culture, and society through a variety of genres, including brief narratives, excerpts, short stories, poetry, plays, non-literary selections, and the arts. Students develop an advanced vocabulary and improved reading comprehension. They discuss and write about the issues and themes presented in the readings as they explore different points-of-view and forms of creative expression. Students are invited to participate in the creative process by transforming their responses to assigned readings into drawings, paintings, and collages. Students develop their writing skills in personal and descriptive narratives as well as essays that compare and contrast or persuade. They learn to edit their writing through peer editing, by using an editing key, and through re-writes. Students review grammatical structures and make oral presentations.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SP408

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP406 Readings in Spanish with Topics II or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP406

    SP408 Readings in Spanish with Topics III

    These courses allow students to synthesize language, ideas and culture in new and rich ways. Conducted entirely in Spanish, these three one-trimester courses constitute a fourth-year level of Spanish study and are designed to serve as a bridge between language study and literature. The courses are an exploration of literature, culture, and society through a variety of genres, including brief narratives, excerpts, short stories, poetry, plays, non-literary selections, and the arts. Students develop an advanced vocabulary and improved reading comprehension. They discuss and write about the issues and themes presented in the readings as they explore different points-of-view and forms of creative expression. Students are invited to participate in the creative process by transforming their responses to assigned readings into drawings, paintings, and collages. Students develop their writing skills in personal and descriptive narratives as well as essays that compare and contrast or persuade. They learn to edit their writing through peer editing, by using an editing key, and through re-writes. Students review grammatical structures and make oral presentations.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SP454

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP408 Readings in Spanish with Topics III or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP408

    SP454 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics I

    Literature in Spanish encompasses writers from Latin America, Spain, and the United States. Reading this literature opens a window into the minds of Spanish-speaking peoples and their cultures. In this course, we invite students to explore this fascinating world and to experience the richness, depth, and variety of its literary expression. Our knowledge of the language prepares us to better appreciate some of the great contributions to world literature, both modern and classical, by writers from all corners of the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted entirely in Spanish, these three one-trimester courses are designed for students with a particularly strong background in Spanish language, reading, and writing. Students explore topics in literature and culture that are beyond the standard curriculum. They read from a variety of genres such as the short story, poetry, plays, essays, and the novel as well as articles related to topics ranging from the practical to the abstract. They develop intensive reading strategies and a more advanced vocabulary, and they write persuasive essays that defend a thesis. Students continue to review advanced grammatical topics and continue to develop their discussion skills in Spanish. Students make oral presentations in Spanish and complete a paper or independent project in Spanish on a topic of interest.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      SP456

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP454 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP454

    SP456 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics II

    Literature in Spanish encompasses writers from Latin America, Spain, and the United States. Reading this literature opens a window into the minds of Spanish-speaking peoples and their cultures. In this course, we invite students to explore this fascinating world and to experience the richness, depth, and variety of its literary expression. Our knowledge of the language prepares us to better appreciate some of the great contributions to world literature, both modern and classical, by writers from all corners of the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted entirely in Spanish, these three one-trimester courses are designed for students with a particularly strong background in Spanish language, reading, and writing. Students explore topics in literature and culture that are beyond the standard curriculum. They read from a variety of genres such as the short story, poetry, plays, essays, and the novel as well as articles related to topics ranging from the practical to the abstract. They develop intensive reading strategies and a more advanced vocabulary, and they write persuasive essays that defend a thesis. Students continue to review advanced grammatical topics and continue to develop their discussion skills in Spanish. Students make oral presentations in Spanish and complete a paper or independent project in Spanish on a topic of interest.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      SP458

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: World Languages
    Credits: One unit World Language credit or one unit core elective credit
    Prerequisite(s): SP454 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics I or equivalent, or permission of the Dean of Humanities.
    Related Links: SP454

    SP458 Advanced Readings in Spanish with Topics III

    Literature in Spanish encompasses writers from Latin America, Spain, and the United States. Reading this literature opens a window into the minds of Spanish-speaking peoples and their cultures. In this course, we invite students to explore this fascinating world and to experience the richness, depth, and variety of its literary expression. Our knowledge of the language prepares us to better appreciate some of the great contributions to world literature, both modern and classical, by writers from all corners of the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted entirely in Spanish, these three one-trimester courses are designed for students with a particularly strong background in Spanish language, reading, and writing. Students explore topics in literature and culture that are beyond the standard curriculum. They read from a variety of genres such as the short story, poetry, plays, essays, and the novel as well as articles related to topics ranging from the practical to the abstract. They develop intensive reading strategies and a more advanced vocabulary, and they write persuasive essays that defend a thesis. Students continue to review advanced grammatical topics and continue to develop their discussion skills in Spanish. Students make oral presentations in Spanish and complete a paper or independent project in Spanish on a topic of interest.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

    Requirements:
    Unless exempt, junior students using this sequence to meet the World Language graduation requirement must complete all three one-trimester courses. Junior students who have exempted the World Language requirement and seniors taking this for core-elective credit may choose to take only one or two trimesters, if they wish.

  •      SS350

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): English III

    SS350 Honors Intro Western Political Thought

    Introduction to Western Political Thought introduces students to the study of political philosophy in exploring ideas and theories on the self/other and identity/existence in questioning one's perspective of the world in relation to moral and ethical issues. Students further examine and interpret meanings on the self and other in relation to such ideas and problems as: East/West, culture, community, power, economics, gender, justice, the nation-state and nationalism, colonialism, and other dynamics. In addition to discussing varied historical political ideas, this course emphasizes the interpretation and discussion of these ideas in light of contemporary political debates. In this course, students read and analyze significant excerpts from philosophical texts in addition to related critical cultural theory.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Mondays 8:00pm.
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Students should have completed 11th Grade English, and be self-motivated and active learners who like to develop their own interpretations.

  •      SS354

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): None

    SS354 Honors Media Studies

    Course Specific Link:

    https://youtu.be/1l-DYLmwOsE?list=PL1zAhPH1F4POqP2tWrOukY_udboCzweBM

    Media Studies is an interdisciplinary cultural studies course in which students examine and interpret the ways various modes of media influence us. Students study media theory, analyze cultural and historical contexts, aesthetics of a variety of formats, examine how forms have shifted, and investigate the relationship between media and reality, ways that media influences and changes our culture, and how responses to media change over time. Students contemplate issues such as: technology, representations of reality, human meaning, identity politics, economics, gender/race/ethnicity, and community/belonging. Students demonstrate understanding by creating original media such as podcasts, videos, social media posts, and graphic narratives in addition to traditional, formal written assignments.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Mondays 8:00 pm.
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional

    Requirements:
    Suggested Skills: Students should be self-motivated and active learners who like to develop their own interpretations.

  •      SS358

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS358 International Relations

    Patterns of change and continuity characterize international relations in the twenty-first century. For example, city-state interactions in ancient Greece demonstrate similar dynamics to great power relations today, such as the interactions between the United States and China. On the other hand, we also find that new technologies (nuclear and cyber weapons) and shared threats (climate change and terrorism) alter these interactions in sometimes counterintuitive ways. International Relations (IR) introduces the formal study of how countries interrelate, focusing on the broad subject areas of international security and economics. In this course, we learn about the primary actors, their various instruments, and patterns of interactions. Students acquire a conceptual toolbox for framing international issues and events and analyzing their causes and consequences. Major course activities include a group project investigating a contemporary conflict, the application of IR theory to current events, a documentary viewing, and regular discussion of international news.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS358

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): None

    SS358 Honors Introduction to International Relations

    Introduction to International Relations presents theoretical approaches to categorizing and understanding how countries relate with each other. This course introduces students to the study of international political questions and issues such as: colonialism, nationalism, genocide, economics, capitalism, globalization, religion, race/ethnicity, identity politics, and cultural conflict and dynamics. This course offers students a conceptual toolbox for framing international interactions and analyzing their causes and consequences. The primary objective is for students to analyze historical and current international relations through contending theoretical perspectives.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Mondays 8:00pm.
    Online Weekend: September 28, 2019/ Optional

  •      SS360

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS360 (Topics in Hist/Social Science) Philosophy: Knowing Mind as Maker of AI (Topic for 2019-2020)

    In critically examining our own minds we will distinguish several basic mental activities. Most basic is INTUITING as looking at or beholding any sensate thing, and even as contemplating mathematical truths or meaning expressed in images or symbols. SUFFERING is also a basic mental activity, as a being subjected to wide ranges of experience and feeling, as presupposed for knowing how another is feeling and even for recognizing and responding to irony and jokes. DREAMING is meaningful lived experience while sleeping, AESTHETIC SENSE is perception of beauty, and ETHICAL AWARENESS is perception of “ought” as “not is,” as presupposing some degree of freedom. Earliest in life is APPERCEPTION as an infant’s experience of being looked at, by mother, as a continuity of being. Even EXPERIENCING NONSENSE may be creative. THINKING is grasping a manifold into a concept; JUDGING is joining concepts into a statement; REASONING is putting statements together logically; AI as computer logic depends on and expresses these three mental acts. We will read and discuss original texts describing mind: Plato, recollection; Aristotle, cause; Augustine, time; Anselm, belief; Descartes and Leibniz, thinking; Kant and Husserl, intending awareness; Winnicott, apperception; Mme de Condorcet and Mme de Lambert, feeling. Eight two-page papers, one class presentation, no final exam.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS362

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS362 (Topics in Hist/Social Science) The Immigrant Experience Today: What is an American? (Topic for 2019-2020)

    The experiences of immigrants to this “nation of immigrants” have a profound influence on our nation’s history and a deep influence on the development of what it means to be an American. Immigration patterns and policy play key roles in these experiences. However, the United States has a fraught relationship with its own immigration history and remains divided about immigration policy. In this course, we examine 20th- and 21st-century public policy and how political decisions affect and reflect the realities faced by immigrants, particularly immigrants from Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. In addition, by reading fiction by authors including Chimamanda Adichie, Junot Diaz, Fae Myenne Ng, and Jhumpa Lahiri, we examine how stories tell personal as well as political truths about the immigrant experience. By collecting oral histories from friends, family, and community members, students will contribute to current scholarship on immigration and will create work that can be contributed to the University of Minnesota immigration archives.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS364

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS364 (Topics in Hist/Social Science III) Comparative Religion (Topic for 2019-2020)

    Religion matters. Even in today's modern, ostensibly secular world, religion continues to exercise a powerful role in the lives and relationships of individuals, communities, and societies. Religious literacy is more important than ever in an increasingly globalized age, and for the promotion of peaceable world. In this course, we investigate the phenomenon of religion as a human activity, taking a comparative approach to examine several of the world's major religious traditions, as well as a number of practices that don't usually count as "religious." We ask a variety of questions about religion, including: What is religion? What commonalities do religions have, and how do they differ—internally and externally? How do religions attempt to address the major problems of human life? What visions of the true, the beautiful, and the good do various religions offer? How do religious adherents and discontents seek to shape their individual and social lives in response to religion? What is the relationship of religion and the modern world, especially regarding secularity and science? To answer these questions, we investigate myth and ritual theory, textual and oral traditions, religious thought and dissent, ethics and identity formation, aesthetics and practices, and more. We also take our exploration out of the classroom, conducting field work to experience religion as it is lived.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS366

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS366 Topics in Psychology

    Students make an in-depth study of several key topics in the field of psychology. After an introduction to the study of psychology – the origins of the discipline, basic theories and terminology, and research methodologies –, students explore special topics which may include abnormal psychology (the history of this area of study, the range of diagnoses in our society today, and current treatment options); medical psychology (psychological conditions that result in illness or death); the psychology of employment and economic class (the effects of work and income levels on mental functions and behavior); the psychology of deviance (how definitions of the term have changed over time; the individual and societal costs of deviance; the origins of deviance and the societal measures used to cope with it); the psychology of the family; and the psychology of advertising. Activities and assessments include readings, lectures, discussions, videos, quizzes, tests, essays, and projects.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS368

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS368 Sociology

    In this course, students gain an understanding of the phenomenon we call "society." Students explore the impact of society on the individual, the various levels of power and inequality in society, and the roles of groups, organizations, and multinational corporations. We discuss the various stages of social change over the course of history, beginning with a discussion of sociological theories and research methods. Often, the theoretical and methodological basis for the assertions in our readings may appear to be “common sense,” but through a detailed examination, we find that this is not the case. According to Berger, "The first wisdom of sociology is this – things are not what they seem. This, too, is a deceptively simple statement. It ceases to be simple after a while. Social reality turns out to have many layers.” We explore the forces that influence us and thus examine our conception of the world around us: the taken-for-granted reality and all its implications.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS372

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS372 Medical Sociology

    In this course, students gain an understanding of the social science of medicine – that is, the study of the social causes and consequences of health and illness. We begin with a review of the history of medical care in the United States and the world in general. We then investigate the social facets of health and disease, the functions of healthcare organizations, the relationship of healthcare delivery systems to other social organizations, the social behavior of healthcare practitioners and consumers, social policies toward health, and the relationship of health services in the United States to other countries.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      SS402

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS402 AP Microeconomics

    This course offers students an opportunity for immersion in a fascinating discipline and in logical thinking. This immersive process involves an introduction to general economic theory and more specific microeconomic theory. Graphical analysis will play a major role in understanding the relationship between economic variables. The course will frequently consider international applications and scenarios while studying microeconomic topics related to income inequality, factor market dynamics, labor costs, and global entrepreneurship. Students pursue this topic through case studies or strategic problems involving pricing issues in product and factor markets, competition across various market structures, and industrial and social regulation within both historic and contemporary environments. Thus, the curriculum content and processes of analyses are organized around holistic, ill-structured, real-world "problems,” and case studies. These experiences are designed to be of an integrated and multi-layered nature and provide opportunities to discover and apply the microeconomics concepts from our readings and discussions. In taking this consciously constructivist approach, we integrate other disciplines into the study of microeconomics. Elements from the fields of psychology, history, political science, and mathematics all have roles to play as we propose resolutions to our microeconomic problems and case studies.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      SS402

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester1
    Prerequisite(s): None

    SS402 AP Microeconomics

    This course offers students an opportunity for immersion in a fascinating discipline and in logical thinking. This immersive process involves an introduction to general economic theory and more specific microeconomic theory. Graphical analysis will play a major role in understanding the relationship between economic variables. The course will frequently consider international applications and scenarios while studying microeconomic topics related to income inequality, factor market dynamics, labor costs, and global entrepreneurship. Students pursue this topic through case studies or strategic problems involving pricing issues in product and factor markets, competition across various market structures, and industrial and social regulation within both historic and contemporary environments. Thus, the curriculum content and processes of analyses are organized around holistic, ill-structured, real-world "problems,” and case studies. These experiences are designed to be of an integrated and multi-layered nature and provide opportunities to discover and apply the microeconomics concepts from our readings and discussions. In taking this consciously constructivist approach, we integrate other disciplines into the study of microeconomics. Elements from the fields of psychology, history, political science, and mathematics all have roles to play as we propose resolutions to our microeconomic problems and case studies.

    Meeting Times:
    Fall Semester: Tuesdays 7:00 pm.
    Online Weekend: November 2, 2019/ Optional

  •      SS404

    School: NCSSM Online
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Semester2
    Prerequisite(s): None

    SS404 AP Macroeconomics

    This course offers students an opportunity for immersion in a fascinating discipline and in logical thinking. This immersive process involves an introduction to general economic theory and more specific macroeconomic theory. Graphical analysis will play a major role in understanding the relationship between economic variables. The course will frequently consider international applications and scenarios while studying macroeconomic topics such as productivity measurement, fiscal and monetary policy, interest rates, inflation, and unemployment. Students pursue these topics through case studies or strategic problems involving national macroeconomic policies for a globalized marketplace environment. Thus, the curriculum content and processes of analyses are organized around holistic, ill-structured, real-world "problems,” and case studies. These experiences are designed to be of an integrated and multi-layered nature and provide opportunities to discover and apply the microeconomics concepts from our readings and discussions. In taking this consciously constructivist approach, we integrate other disciplines into the study of macroeconomics. Elements from the fields of psychology, history, political science, and mathematics all have roles to play as we propose resolutions to our macroeconomic problems and case studies.

    Meeting Times:
    Spring Semester: Tuesdays 7:00 pm.
    Online Weekend: March 14, 2020/ Optional

  •      SS404

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS404 AP Macroeconomics

    This course offers students an opportunity for immersion in a fascinating discipline and in logical thinking. This immersive process involves an introduction to general economic theory and more specific macroeconomic theory. Graphical analysis will play a major role in understanding the relationship between economic variables. The course will frequently consider international applications and scenarios while studying macroeconomic topics such as productivity measurement, fiscal and monetary policy, interest rates, inflation, and unemployment. Students pursue these topics through case studies or strategic problems involving national macroeconomic policies for a globalized marketplace environment. Thus, the curriculum content and processes of analyses are organized around holistic, ill-structured, real-world "problems,” and case studies. These experiences are designed to be of an integrated and multi-layered nature and provide opportunities to discover and apply the microeconomics concepts from our readings and discussions. In taking this consciously constructivist approach, we integrate other disciplines into the study of macroeconomics. Elements from the fields of psychology, history, political science, and mathematics all have roles to play as we propose resolutions to our macroeconomic problems and case studies.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two 100-minute evening class meetings.

  •      SS406

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1, Trimester2, Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS406 Introduction to Psychology

    This one-trimester social science elective introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. We explore a range of issues, concerns, and specialties in psychology. Initially, we spend a considerable amount of time discussing the psychological perspective and the role of theory and research in psychology. Then we move into an in-depth study of key components of psychology. We learn about some of the explorations and discoveries made by psychologists over the past century and compare, contrast, and assess some of the differing approaches adopted by psychologists, including biological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural perspectives. Most importantly, we come to an understanding and appreciation of how psychologists think and the kind of critical analysis that psychologists espouse and model in their words and actions.

    Meeting Times:
    Four periods per week.

  •      SS412

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit

    SS412 Environmental Economic Systems: Buddha, Marx, Elvis, and the Wolves

    This course investigates the dynamics of the contemporary global market system in both a theoretical and an historical context and as such seeks to understand the implications of a growth-oriented economic structure for a finite environment. We seek this understanding through an investigation into “Buddhist Economics,” or the concept of limiting growth by limiting desires; we look into the origins of obsessive growth with the concept of primitive accumulation as described by Marx in Das Kapital; likewise, we explore the symbiotic relationship between consumer culture and popular culture that seems to accelerate our economic growth rate as pop culture icons like Elvis become a stimulus for consumption; and finally we try to understand the impact of unlimited economic growth through the experiences of the wolves of Japan and North America. This is done through three case studies or strategic problems involving a comparison of neo-classical economic theory and alternative economic systems, the economics of ecology, and the economics of popular culture. Thus, the course can serve both as an introduction to the study of economic applications to contemporary real-world problems and a continued investigation into economic theory and philosophy.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab or two evening class meetings.

  •      SS414

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Humanities
    Subject: History & Social Sciences
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit core elective credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of SS402 AP Macroeconomics and/or SS404 AP Microeconomics
    Related Links: SS402, SS404

    SS414 Contemporary Challenges in Economics

    This course affords students an opportunity to conduct an extended investigation into Advanced Placement Economics concepts and principles. The course is designed to explore these concepts and principles as applied in the contemporary global economic framework. Project-based and student-driven, the course provides students with a platform to research modern real-world challenges and design innovative solutions. Some contemporary challenges that may be addressed include artificial intelligence, income inequality, globalization, sustainability, and climate change. Importantly, the specific challenges selected will be student initiated. The course will proceed with an intentional interdisciplinary focus, as the challenges to be addressed transcend any one area of knowledge. Moreover, a portion of the course will provide a substantive and thorough preparation for examinations in both AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics.

    Meeting Times:
    Three periods per week including lab.

  •      VS102

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS102 Men's Soccer

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS104

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS104 Women's Volleyball

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS106

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS106 Women's Tennis

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS108

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS108 Cross-Country

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS110

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS110 Competitive Cheer

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS112

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester1
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS112 Women's Golf

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS122

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS122 Men's Basketball

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS124

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS124 Women's Basketball

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS126

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS126 Swimming

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS128

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS128 Wrestling

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS130

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS130 Cheerleading

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS132

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS132 Indoor Track

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS134

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester2
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS134 Diving

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS142

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS142 Men's Golf

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS144

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS144 Men's Tennis

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS146

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS146 Men's Baseball

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS148

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS148 Women's Softball

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS150

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS150 Women's Soccer

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

  •      VS152

    School: NCSSM Residential (Durham)
    Dept: Physical Activity & Wellness
    Term(s) Currently Offered: Trimester3
    Credits: One unit physical activity credit

    VS152 Track and Field

    These courses are a way for students who engage in the recommended amount of weekly exercise for a healthy lifestyle through an NCSSM Interscholastic Varsity Sport to meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness graduation requirement or to satisfy an entering credit deficiency in physical activity from 9th/10th grade. Instruction in each sport is geared to developing a high functional level of physical fitness through cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and drills; knowledge of the rules, techniques, and strategies of the sport; and the athletic ability to execute them in an interscholastic competition. Students registered for VS Varsity Sports must be selected by the coach to be on the team and must participate in a minimum of three practices/competitions per week during the sport's season. Students unable to meet these requirements for any reason (poor academic performance in other courses, medical, or disciplinary reasons) will be dropped from VS Varsity Sports and must meet the NCSSM physical activity/wellness requirement by completing another activity-based PA course. NOTE: Though students may be involved in a varsity sport each term, they receive academic credit for VS Varsity Sports only once unless satisfying an entering credit deficiency in physical activity.

    Meeting Times:
    Practices are typically held Mondays through Fridays 4:30pm – 6:30pm. Competitions vary according to sport by day of week and starting time.

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